Tag: race

Discrimination and Health Part II: People of Color

Last week, I talked about how discrimination faced in healthcare settings can impact LGBTQ+ individuals’ attitudes towards healthcare, and how facing discrimination in everyday life can negatively impact their health outcomes. People of color (PoC) in the U.S., including immigrants, refugees, and Indigenous Peoples, face this double-barreled oppression as well.

Of course, one way racism affects health is through the broad structures that have placed many PoC groups at disadvantaged positions, intersecting with poverty – one study found that almost 100,000 black people die prematurely each year who would not die were there no racial disparities in health.

But discrimination itself, even on an individual level, can impact the health and healthcare experiences of PoC. Microaggressions, or everyday interactions rooted in racism, are a daily stressor for PoC, and these stressors can lead to premature illness and mortality.

Of course, this discrimination doesn’t just happen in daily interactions, but also in medical settings, which rightfully leads to mistrust and under-use of healthcare for PoC. Language and cultural barriers faced by immigrants can have similar effects.

Because race, socioeconomic status, and health are so intertwined, it may never be possible to know what levels of discrimination have the greatest ultimate effects on health outcomes. But we know they all have at least some, which should be enough to demand action.

Sources: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12042611

https://www.hindawi.com/journals/tswj/2013/512313/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2821669/#!po=2.38095

https://health.usnews.com/health-news/patient-advice/articles/2016-02-11/racial-bias-in-medicine-leads-to-worse-care-for-minorities

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2696665/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17001262

Why You Should Run A Turkey Trot Tomorrow.

Tomorrow is Thanksgiving, and while you’re probably looking forward to the big meal, don’t forget that between drinks, snacks, dinner, and dessert, calories can add up quick. Most Thanksgiving meals can range anywhere from 1,200-3,000 calories easy. However, Thanksgiving is a time for family and good food, so rather than stress about overeating, why not join the other 800,000 runners in a pre-meal Turkey Trot!

Worried about missing out on some of the family-filled holiday? Bring the family with you! Most Turkey Trots offer races for all ages. Worried about missing the parade or the football games? Most Turkey Trots are early in the morning, so you’ll be back before the parade or games even begin! Besides burning off some extra calories, running a Turkey Trot can also make you feel more energized throughout the day and can prevent you from overeating.

Convinced yet? Most races offer same-day registration, so it’s not too late to sign up to burn some calories before the big meal! Here are some Turkey Trots going on in the area:

Durham: The Renaissance Center Thanksgiving Day Turkey Trot. With a choice to run an 8k (5 miles), a 5k, a 1 mile fun-run, or a 100 meter dash (for kids), this Turkey Trot is one for the whole family! Races start at 8:30 and 9:30 a.m.

Burlington: The Truliant Turkey Trot 5K and Family Fun Run. Costumes encouraged! Race starts at 8:00 a.m., Fun Run starts at 8:05 a.m.

Carrboro: The Gallop & Gorge 8k. This 5 mile race may sound daunting, but both walkers and runners are welcome! Race starts at 8 a.m.

Cary: Inside Out Sports Turkey Trot. The 1-Mile Fun Run/Walk starts at 8:30 a.m. The featured 8K starts at 9 a.m., and the 100-yard Kid’s Dash for children ages 7 and under starts at 10:00 a.m.

Raleigh: Just Think First 5K and Skinny Turkey Half Marathon. If you’re feeling extra ambitious, this race offers a half marathon (starts at 7:30 a.m.). If not, the 5k begins at 8 a.m.