Tag: mental health

Are you processing or are you ruminating?

I am a self-described over-thinker.  From a young age, my family often complained that I over analyzed everything.  While this has served me well in many pursuits, I recently read that it may not be so great for my health.

According to a recent article by U.S. News and World Report, rumination over stressful or negative events may lead to prolonged psychological recovery time along with increased blood pressure and heart rate (1).  While I’m still an advocate for processing difficult situations, rumination is different.  Rumination typically leads to repeatedly and cyclically thinking about the same situation while creating moods that spiral downward (1).   People often end up ruminating without realizing it; they think they’re attempting to problem-solve instead (1).  I know this speaks to the analytical “Ms. Fix-it” in me.

According to the article, people can identify if they’re in rumination mode by asking themselves if their thoughts are unproductive, creating feelings of being overwhelmed, or causing distractions from their surroundings (1).  Suggestions to get past this include distraction by taking a walk or enjoying a hobby (1).

Now, all of this is said with a giant caveat-  if you feel like you need mental health help, get it.  Rumination often happens when people are dealing with something traumatic in their lives.  I am by no means telling you to shove your feelings down and avoid them.  What I am encouraging you to do is stop and ask yourself if you’re having the same negative thoughts over and over again.  If you feel like it’s something minor, you may want to stop and distract yourself to break the cycle.  If it’s something that’s a big deal to you, then you may need to enlist the help of a mental health professional.

Thinking about situations is helpful, but if three days have passed, and you’re still thinking about how the coffee-shop barista spelled your name wrong, you may be ruminating and hurting your health in the process.

 

Reference

  1. Colino, Stacey. The Hazards of Rumination for Your Mental and Physical Health. U. S. News and World Report. [Online] March 14, 2018. https://health.usnews.com/wellness/mind/articles/2018-03-14/the-hazards-of-rumination-for-your-mental-and-physical-health.

 

Study confirms grad students have higher rates of anxiety and depression

I’m currently in my second semester of grad school, and I have heard many people talking positively about mental healthcare since I’ve been here.  Within the first few days of classes in August, we were informed where and how to get mental health help on campus.  I know plenty of people who have sought assistance with their mental health, and they speak about it without any sort of stigma.  All of this talk got me wondering, what’s behind this positivity?  Is it:

A) My department is super supportive

B) We’re a bunch of public health enthusiasts who want to dismantle stigma in every way we can

C) There’s a huge need for mental healthcare among graduate students

It turns out that the answer is likely: D) all of the above.

According to a recent study published in Nature Biotechnology the prevalence of both moderate to severe and anxiety and moderate to severe depression is over six times higher in graduate students than in the general population (1).  The good news is that the study also found that a good work-life balance helps improve mental health (1).  This means the next time someone tells you to take care of yourself, they’re not just repeating trite advice.  It really is important.

If you’re one of the many grad students (or anyone for that matter) who feels overwhelmed, know that you’re not alone.  Many of us are there with you, and it’s OK if you need to enlist the help of a professional.  Personally, I view this as a sign of strength instead of weakness.

 

Reference

(1) Pain, Elisabeth. Graduate students need more mental health support, new study highlights. ScienceMag.org. [Online] March 6, 2018. http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2018/03/graduate-students-need-more-mental-health-support-new-study-highlights.

Celebrities, Social Media, and Mental Illness

By Jacob Rohde

Earlier this month, Selena Gomez opened up to Harper’s Bazaar magazine about her struggles with mental illness [1]. When asked about her upcoming plans for the new year, Gomez responded:

“I will always start with my health and my wellbeing. I’ve had a lot of issues with depression and anxiety, and I’ve been very vocal about it, but it’s not something I feel I’ll ever overcome… I think it’s a battle I’m gonna have to face for the rest of my life…”

Gomez is joined by several other celebrities, from Gina Rodriguez to Kid Cudi, who have spoken out about the realities of their mental illnesses and have used social media to publicly vocalize their related experiences [2]. For example, Gomez recently used Instagram to talk about her lupus diagnosis, which she has linked to her depression and anxiety [3]. All too often, celebrities are viewed as immune to such circumstances when, in reality, they share many of our own battles with mental illness. Social media allows celebrities, like Gomez, to connect with their audiences who may also struggle from mental illness, or to those who do not fully understand the complexity of mental illness symptoms.

Fifty percent of Americans will experience some form of mental illness in their lifetime [4], yet public perceptions about mental illness remain highly stigmatized, especially among young adults and college students [5]. In my own experiences, I have witnessed several students express their reluctance to seek mental health services as to avoid being “outed” by peers and stereotyped.

Efforts to reduce mental illness stigma can benefit from the stories and experiences shared by celebrities through their social media accounts. Indeed, a recent study found that college students exposed to celebrity narratives about mental disorders were far less likely to stigmatize mental illness overall and had fewer negative perceptions about those who seek help for mental illness than students in control conditions [6]. Given this, celebrity use of social media as a platform to talk about mental illness may have a positive effect on how the public perceives mental illness.

Of course, I am not advocating for celebrities to share deeply personal experiences. However, if they choose to address certain issues pertaining to their mental health, it may serve to reduce the taboo culture currently surrounding depression, anxiety, and other mental illnesses. At minimum, doing so shows that celebrities, like Gomez, are not so different than ourselves.


Mental illness is a serious concern. If you are struggling, please seek professional help or reach out to the 24/7 suicide prevention hotline: 1-800-273-8255

If you are a UNC student, free support is available through the Counseling and Psychological Services program (CAPS). Information available here: https://caps.unc.edu/


References:

  1. Langford, K. (2018). Selena Gomez’s Wild Ride. Harper’s Bazaar. Retrieved from http://www.harpersbazaar.com/culture/features/a15895669/selena-gomez-intervi ew/
  2. Yang, L. (2017). 23 celebrities who have opened up about their struggles with mental illness. Retrieved from http://www.thisisinsider.com/celebrities-depression-anxiety-mental-health-awaren ess-2017-11#cara-delevingne-struggled-with-depression-as-a-teenager-8
  3. Chiu, M. (2016). Selena gomez taking time off after dealing with ‘anxiety, panic attacks and depression’ due to her lupus diagnosis. People Magazine. Retrieved from http://people.com/celebrity/selena-gomez-taking-a-break-after-lupus-complication s/
  4. Kessler, R. C., Angermeyer, M., Anthony, J. C., De Graaf, R. O. N., Demyttenaere, K., Gasquet, I., … & Kawakami, N. (2007). Lifetime prevalence and age-of-onset distributions of mental disorders in the World Health Organization’s World Mental Health Survey Initiative. World Psychiatry, 6(3), 168.
  5. Eisenberg, D., Downs, M. F., Golberstein, E., & Zivin, K. (2009). Stigma and help seeking for mental health among college students. Medical Care Research and Review, 66(5), 522-541.
  6. Ferrari, A. (2016). Using celebrities in abnormal psychology as teaching tools to decrease stigma and increase help seeking. Teaching of Psychology, 43(4), 329-333.

Are Mobile Mental Health Apps User-Friendly?

by Kat Caskey

Currently, only about half of those affected by mental illness in the United States will receive any kind of treatment[1]. In the past few years, however, experts have begun to look to remote healthcare options that could improve access to mental health treatment. Perhaps most promising is the growing consensus that mental health apps, or mHealth apps, “have unprecedented potential for improving quality of life and public health outcomes” for the tens of millions of people affected by mental health conditions in the U.S. each year.[2]

Mobile apps have the unique potential to reduce many of the traditional barriers to mental health treatment. For example, mHealth apps can be significantly less expensive than traditional treatment and may be accessed anytime, including during times of crisis, without an appointment. In addition, apps can reduce cultural barriers to care as they provide a “discrete mobile environment” free from social stigma.[3]

Evidence-based mHealth apps have been proven effective at treating a variety of mental health conditions, including posttraumatic stress disorder[4], anxiety[5], depression[6], obsessive compulsive disorder[7], bipolar disorder, borderline personality disorder, and substance abuse[8]. Unfortunately, however, although patients frequently download any of the myriad of mental health apps available in the App store, many are deleted after only a few uses, and a staggering 26% are used only once. One study that surveyed mental health app users found that among the most common reasons for deleting mental health apps included “not engaging” and “not user friendly,” with “ease of navigation” being the top feature that makes eHealth apps for mental health favorable.[9]

What good are evidence-based mental health apps if people won’t use them? These results indicate trouble in the realm of user experience, which considers “user emotions, affects, motivations, and values” as well as “ease of use, ease of learning and basic subjective satisfaction.”[10] Understanding user experience has been identified as “a key step in realizing the role of mental health apps”[11] and reminds us that it is not enough to understand the clinical basis of new health technologies; equally significant is consideration of the best ways to design and implement apps for people with mental health conditions. Ideally, user experience and usability testing evaluations should involve all relevant stakeholders, including patients and providers.[12]

Especially considering the wide reach of mHealth apps, “even minor efforts to further refine the usability and utility of the app” have the potential to decrease app attrition rates and increase user exposure to evidence-based treatment recommendations.[13] As apps designed to improve mental health continue to proliferate, app designers and researchers should continue to investigate how an emphasis on user experience can improve mHealth tools for mental health.

[1] National Institute of Mental Health. https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/statistics/index.shtml.  Accessed February 4, 2018.

[2] Owen, J. E., Jaworski, B. K., Kuhn, E., Makin-Byrd, K. N., Ramsey, K. M., & Hoffman, J. E. (2015). mHealth in the wild: using novel data to examine the reach, use, and impact of PTSD coach. JMIR mental health2(1).

[3] Owen, J. E., Jaworski, B. K., Kuhn, E., Makin-Byrd, K. N., Ramsey, K. M., & Hoffman, J. E. (2015). mHealth in the wild: using novel data to examine the reach, use, and impact of PTSD coach. JMIR mental health2(1).

[4]Rodriguez-Paras, C., Tippey, K., Brown, E., Sasangohar, F., Creech, S., Kum, H. C., … & Benzer, J. K. (2017). Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Mobile Health: App Investigation and Scoping Literature Review. JMIR mHealth and uHealth5(10).;
Owen, J. E., Jaworski, B. K., Kuhn, E., Makin-Byrd, K. N., Ramsey, K. M., & Hoffman, J. E. (2015). mHealth in the wild: using novel data to examine the reach, use, and impact of PTSD coach. JMIR mental health2(1).

[5] Sucala, M., Cuijpers, P., Muench, F., Cardoș, R., Soflau, R., Dobrean, A., … & David, D. (2017). Anxiety: There is an app for that. A systematic review of anxiety apps. Depression and anxiety.

[6] Lattie, E. G., Schueller, S. M., Sargent, E., Stiles-Shields, C., Tomasino, K. N., Corden, M. E., … & Mohr, D. C. (2016). Uptake and usage of IntelliCare: a publicly available suite of mental health and well-being apps. Internet interventions4, 152-158.

[7] Ameringen, M., Turna, J., Khalesi, Z., Pullia, K., & Patterson, B. (2017). There is an app for that! The current state of mobile applications (apps) for DSM‐5 obsessive‐compulsive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, anxiety and mood disorders. Depression and anxiety.

[8] Rizvi, S. L., Dimeff, L. A., Skutch, J., Carroll, D., & Linehan, M. M. (2011). A pilot study of the DBT coach: an interactive mobile phone application for individuals with borderline personality disorder and substance use disorder. Behavior therapy42(4), 589-600.

[9] Smith, D. Motivating Patients to use Smartphone Health Apps. Consumer Health Information Corporation. http://www.consumer-health.com/motivating-patients-to-use-smartphone-health-apps/. Published 2014. Accessed February 4, 2018.

[10] Abrahão, S., Bordeleau, F., Cheng, B., Kokaly, S., Paige, R. F., Störrle, H., & Whittle, J. (2017, September). User Experience for Model-Driven Engineering: Challenges and Future Directions. In 2017 ACM/IEEE 20th International Conference on Model Driven Engineering Languages and Systems (MODELS) (pp. 229-236). IEEE.

[11] Lemon, Christopher. “The User Experience: A Key Step in Realizing the Role of Mental Health Apps.” Psychiatric Times, 7 Feb. 2018, www.psychiatrictimes.com/telepsychiatry/user-experience-key-step-realizing-role-mental-health-apps.

[12] Price, M., Yuen, E. K., Goetter, E. M., Herbert, J. D., Forman, E. M., Acierno, R., & Ruggiero, K. J. (2014). mHealth: a mechanism to deliver more accessible, more effective mental health care. Clinical psychology & psychotherapy21(5), 427-436.

[13] Owen, J. E., Jaworski, B. K., Kuhn, E., Makin-Byrd, K. N., Ramsey, K. M., & Hoffman, J. E. (2015). mHealth in the wild: using novel data to examine the reach, use, and impact of PTSD coach. JMIR mental health2(1).

From Ke$ha to Kesha: A Glitter Queen’s Ascension to Self-Care Goddess

Last week, pop-artist Kesha authored a piece for Time on the added pressure of the Holiday season for those living with Mental Illness. In the piece, she discusses the added pressures that this time of year can add, but you might be asking yourself, who is Kesha to give me life advice?

Following a year that included a highly publicized comeback single, accompanied by her second Number One album, a critically proclaimed tour, and her first Grammy nominations, one could say things are going well for the artist who’s early career was built on electro-pop and a quirky party girl aesthetic. While her new album highlights overcoming personal struggles and finding self-acceptance, it has not been all Rainbows for Kesha.

While promoting her albums upcoming release over the summer, Kesha released a series of letters to fans regarding each single that dropped, sharing an intimate and personal look into the process of how she turned her pain into art. She touched on her time in rehab for an eating disorder, her struggles with mental illness, and her decision to drop the $ from her name. Starting with a piece published in Lenny Letter opening up about depression, finding empathy, and the process of turning pain into art through Praying, to a piece from Rolling Stone where she shared about her idols and Female Empowerment in Woman, to Learning to Let Go and defining her own mantras in Huffington Post, to sharing in Mic on feeling like an outcast and her passion for equality on Hymn, and finishing with a piece in Refinery29 regarding the album’s title track, Kesha provided fans with a detailed look into her songwriting process and personal life.

In being vulnerable, Kesha not only reminds us that there is a reason to keep fighting when things are not going well, but also continues an ongoing effort to destigmatize mental health. Through her songs and her form of blogging, Kesha showed the world the destruction of perfectionism and the benefits of radical self-love.

But rest assured: I can speak from seeing her in concert this fall that our girl still loves her glitter. Here’s to continue to rooting for her to continue reaching for the stars and shining bright for her fans in years to come.

Sources:

Kesha: The Holidays Are Hard If You Struggle With Mental Illness. Don’t Blame Yourself: http://time.com/5041017/kesha-self-care-holidays/

Kesha Fights Back in Her New Single, “Praying”: http://www.lennyletter.com/culture/a904/kesha-is-back-with-a-new-single-praying/

Read Kesha’s Poignant Essay About Celebratory New Song ‘Woman”: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/premieres/read-keshas-poignant-essay-about-celebratory-new-song-woman-w491950

Learn to Let Go: https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/kesha-learn-to-let-go_us_59790480e4b02a8434b3841f

Read Kesha’s essay on her new single “Hymn” – a song for “people who feel like outcasts”: https://mic.com/articles/183195/kesha-essay-new-single-hymn-for-people-who-feel-like-outcasts#.D1hhvBGGM

Kesha: “What’s Left Of My Heart Is Fucking Pure Gold & No One Can Touch That”: http://www.refinery29.com/2017/08/167127/kesha-rainbow-lyrics-meaning-album-inspiration

A Blueprint to “Win” the War on Drugs

What can the United States learn from Portugal about the war on drugs?

A Guest Post by Becca Fritton.

On October 26, 2017, Trump declared the opioid crisis a National Public Health Emergency. As Andrew Bradford discussed in his October 27 post, while a first step, this announcement does not immediately open up additional funding for the crisis, but instead gives access to funding that already exists. Unfortunately, this funding is almost running out. [1] It is important to note that while this announcement raises the voice of the conversation around opioid use in the United States, many do not even consider this a beginning of a plan to address the epidemic.

Any discussion or solution proposed around addiction is remiss without discussing criminalization. Nicholas Kristof of the New York Times put forth a stunning summary of how Portugal has managed to “win” the war drugs. While drug dealers still go to prison in Portugal, they have made it an “administrative offense” to possess or purchase a small quantity of drugs. Instead of going to jail or to trial, offenders attend a meeting with social workers who work towards preventing a casual user from becoming dependent on drugs. Rather than viewing an individual as a criminal, officials in Portugal focus on the individual’s health and help them find resources they need to stay healthy.

Those who are dependent on drugs need medical care, not punishment. The Health Ministry of Portugal also targeted certain neighborhoods and populations for passing out clean needles and encouraging methadone instead of heroin. At large events or concerts, the ministry would offer to test individuals’ drugs to advise if they were safe or not. Portugal’s government has also funded widespread use of methadone vans that supply users with a free and controlled amount of methadone.

This approach has worked extremely well for Portugal and now they have the lowest drug mortality rate in Western Europe, and one-fiftieth the latest count in the United States. [2] The United States should take note and begin moving in a different direction. Instead of funding prisons and jails, the government should place more funding and infrastructure in place to address addiction from a mental and public health standpoint.

Becca can be contacted via email at: rfritton [@] berkeley [dot] edu

 

[1] Allen, G. and Kelly, A. (2017). Trump Administration Declares Opioid Crisis a Public Health Emergency. National Public Radio. Retrieved from: https://www.npr.org/2017/10/26/560083795/president-trump-may-declare-opioid-epidemic-national-emergency

[2] Kristof, N. (2017). How to “Win” the War on Drugs. New York Times. Retrieved from: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/22/opinion/sunday/portugal-drug-decriminalization.html

Impostor Experience: The Advice I Keep Giving Myself in Graduate School

Impostor experience is characterized as having an inability to internalize one’s accomplishments, where those who experience it feel that they are a fraud, that they have somehow deceived others to believe that they are smarter than they actually are. These feelings occur even when contradicted by success, often crediting luck or good timing over their own hard work and effort. And it is quite prevalent in academic spaces.

When I started my graduate career, I was lucky enough to have professors who were well aware of this topic, encouraging students to reach out when they needed to, reminding us that we all have expertise to contribute to the classroom, we all have a space.

As a first generation college student, I still have moments almost daily where I feel like I don’t belong, that this isn’t really the place for me. Sometimes it’s a simple comment, someone in class sharing an experience, like “Oh my dad’s a doctor”. Don’t get me wrong, my parents are two of the hardest working people I know. But there are constantly reminders for me that in pursuing a graduate degree, I’m taking a career path that not many people who knew me as a child could even imagine.

Below I’ve attached some resources that I have found particularly helpful at some low points in my academic career. But what has helped the most for me is opening up to my friends and classmates, and realizing that I am not the only one having these feelings. I’m writing this because I’m not perfect at taking my own advice, I still need to step back and use some of these strategies, and I still need to practice opening up when I’m struggling.

Sources:

APA Cover Story: Feel like a fraud? http://www.apa.org/gradpsych/2013/11/fraud.aspx

The Chronicle of Higher Education: Impostor Syndrome is Definitely a Thing: http://www.chronicle.com/article/Impostor-Syndrome-Is/238418

Straight Skinny, but Gay Fat? Reflections on Pride, the intersection of identity and mental health, and the stigmatization of queer bodies

This past weekend marked the 33rd annual celebration of North Carolina Pride, a time to celebrate the beauty, diversity, and resiliency of the LGBTQ community. The week of October 1-7 is Mental Illness Awareness Week, observed by the National Alliance on Mental Illness, to “fight stigma, provide support, educate the public and advocate for equal care” in regards to mental health. Studies have shown that LGBTQ+ identified individuals are three times more likely to live with a mental health condition than their heterosexual counterparts. This includes, but is not limited to: depression, anxiety, eating disorders, or Body Dysmorphic Disorder, to name a few.

Body Dysmorphic Disorder, or BDD, is classified as a body-image disorder where individuals have persistent and intrusive preoccupations with a defect in their appearance, which can be imagined or slight. Obsessions about appearance can be all consuming, and make it hard for those affected to focus on other areas of their lives. Oftentimes, those living with BDD can perform a compulsive or repetitive behavior, with some examples being: avoiding mirrors, skin picking, excessive grooming, excessive exercise, frequently changing clothes, trying to hide or conceal body parts, or in extreme cases seeking surgery to correct the perceived flaw or flaws. These behaviors can lead to feelings of low self-esteem, resulting in avoiding social situations and having difficulties with work responsibilities and personal life. Individuals suffering with severe BDD are also at a higher risk of having suicidal thoughts or to attempt suicide.

People living with BDD often also suffer from other anxiety and mental health disorders, such as social anxiety disorder, depression, eating disorders, or obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). Because of similarities and overlap of symptoms, BDD can be misdiagnosed as one of these other mental health disorders, specifically with similarities to OCD, being distinguished when behaviors focus specifically on appearance. According the American Psychiatric Association, between 2.2-2.5% of people in the US experience BDD, and it usually begins to occur around the age of 12-13.

As someone living with BDD, I spent years of my life not having words to describe what I was feeling, being hyper aware of my body and the way I see it as being perceived by others. Most of the time, these are internal conflicts, rarely do they manifest in ways that are visible for others. On Saturday night, I was waiting in line to get into a gay night club to celebrate Pride with friends. When it was time to pay the cover to enter, the thought of people looking at my body, of people touching parts of my body that I find unsightly, resulted in a panic attack where I ended up leaving and going home. This isn’t the first time I’ve felt uncomfortable in a space like this, but I can’t shake the feeling of letting my friends down, of allowing my insecurities to get in the way of what was supposed to be a fun night out.

My bigger concern is that my experience isn’t unique, that others have also struggled to feel accepted in places that are supposed to be welcoming to then. The unrealistic standards around body image in queer spaces foster an environment of self-doubt, generate feelings of insecurity, and further reinforce the heteronormative narrative that is already placed on us by larger society as a whole.

But issues around unrealistic body issues aren’t the only problem facing the LGBTQ community. Blatant and covert racism, misogyny, and the policing of how others live their lives are also major hurdles that we need to overcome. And many of our spaces aren’t accessible to a number of people due to cost.

On top of all of this, we don’t give each other spaces to talk about the ways we are struggling, whether that be with our mental health, our interpersonal relationships, or how we are handling navigating a society that simply is not designed for us. My hope is that by sharing, it will open up a space for others to acknowledge what they are feeling, to finally have words to define those feelings, or to simply be aware of the struggles that others are going through.

Below are some sources if you are interested in learning more about the topics that I discussed here. If you feel that you need to reach out, talking with a mental health professional can be a great place to start. If you are a student here at UNC, CAPS offers a variety of mental health services, more information can be found below.

For CAPS Walk-In Services:

Go to the 3rd floor of the Campus Health Services Building

MON-THURS: 9 am – noon or 1 pm – 4 pm

FRI: 9:30 am – noon or 1 pm – 4 pm

Sources –

National Alliance on Mental Illness Awareness Week – https://www.nami.org/Get-Involved/Awareness-Events/Mental-Illness-Awareness-Week

National Alliance on Mental Illness LGBTQ – https://www.nami.org/Find-Support/LGBTQ

Anxiety and Depression Association of America: Body Dysmorphic Disorder – https://adaa.org/understanding-anxiety/related-illnesses/other-related-conditions/body-dysmorphic-disorder-bdd

9/11, Hurricane Season, and disaster-related Secondary Traumatic Stress

Yesterday was the 16th anniversary of the 9/11 Terror Attack, and like many Americans I can easily recount where I was at when I saw the coverage of the attack. The event dominated news media for weeks after the events unfolded, and became enshrined as a defining moment of 21st century America.

I cannot even begin to fathom the first hand experiences of people who directly impacted from the attack, but for many, the day is a permanent memory of the way they felt, perceived, and witnessed everything unfold.

Secondary Traumatic Stress occurs when an individual hears the recounting of another’s traumatic life event. Often, the symptoms are similar to that of the more commonly known Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, or PTSD. In recent years, there has been more research being done to see the effects of disasters that affect those beyond those immediately experiencing an event.

In the wake of the recent disasters of Hurricane Harvey and Irma, we have seen coverage of their destruction everywhere from major news sources to the social media that we consume for updates from loved ones. A recent New York Times piece noted that the Weather Channel, being the only network to provide 24/7 access to coverage of the recent Hurricanes, had seen its audience increase nearly tenfold. The coverage of these storms has been vast, because the scale of the destruction of these storms has been unprecedented.

Covering these events is vital, it is important that we do not sensor the news that we receive just because of the harmful effects that it may have on us. But, by being more aware, and staying informed, we can acknowledge the way that having information so freely available can help us to cope, and hopefully heal, together.

 

Sources –

New York Times Piece: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/09/business/media/weather-channel-hurricane-irma.html?_r=0

Secondary Traumatic Stress: http://www.nctsn.org/resources/topics/secondary-traumatic-stress

The Fault in Our Stars: What the Movie Didn’t Tell Us about Childhood Cancer

There are numerous movies about adolescents living with cancer and overcoming it; The Fault in Our Stars, Me Earl and the Dying Girl, etc. Typically, they include a heartwarming love story or  a monumental last hurrah and then receive a promising prognosis. The audience walks away after shedding a few tears and laughs and moves on with their own lives. However, what these movies don’t tell us is what happens after the credits roll and these adolescents continue their lifelong journey as a “cancer patient”.

 

Research has shown that adolescent cancer survivors tend to report lower quality of life compared to peers such as more general health concerns, mental health concerns and physical activity limitations. Additionally, many of them experience difficulties such as academic problems, low self esteem, anxiety and depression. Luckily, we are starting to see a trend of programs created specifically for this population to help ease the transition of cancer patient to returning to a “normal kid/teen lifestyle”. Dana- Farber and Boston Children’s Hospital have a unique program called the “Transition to Survivorship Program” to provide resources and opportunities to help ease this transition for children and adolescents and their families and caregivers. While the movie’s show a happy ending, for many of these patients it’s a quite a long road before arriving at their happy ending.

 

Sources:

http://www.danafarberbostonchildrens.org/why-choose-us/cancer-survivorship/transition-off-therapy.aspx

http://ascopubs.org/doi/full/10.1200/JCO.2009.23.4278