Tag: Immigrants

Discrimination and Health Part II: People of Color

Last week, I talked about how discrimination faced in healthcare settings can impact LGBTQ+ individuals’ attitudes towards healthcare, and how facing discrimination in everyday life can negatively impact their health outcomes. People of color (PoC) in the U.S., including immigrants, refugees, and Indigenous Peoples, face this double-barreled oppression as well.

Of course, one way racism affects health is through the broad structures that have placed many PoC groups at disadvantaged positions, intersecting with poverty – one study found that almost 100,000 black people die prematurely each year who would not die were there no racial disparities in health.

But discrimination itself, even on an individual level, can impact the health and healthcare experiences of PoC. Microaggressions, or everyday interactions rooted in racism, are a daily stressor for PoC, and these stressors can lead to premature illness and mortality.

Of course, this discrimination doesn’t just happen in daily interactions, but also in medical settings, which rightfully leads to mistrust and under-use of healthcare for PoC. Language and cultural barriers faced by immigrants can have similar effects.

Because race, socioeconomic status, and health are so intertwined, it may never be possible to know what levels of discrimination have the greatest ultimate effects on health outcomes. But we know they all have at least some, which should be enough to demand action.

Sources: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12042611

https://www.hindawi.com/journals/tswj/2013/512313/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2821669/#!po=2.38095

https://health.usnews.com/health-news/patient-advice/articles/2016-02-11/racial-bias-in-medicine-leads-to-worse-care-for-minorities

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2696665/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17001262

What is DACA?

There has been a lot of buzz around “DACA” the last couple days; which has left many of us wondering, “what is DACA?” The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival program, or DACA, was enacted by the Obama Administration in June 2012. The program

The program had granted undocumented immigrant children, who entered the U.S. before their 16th birthday, a renewable two-year deportation protection and work permit while they either worked, attended school, or served in the military. However, it did not provide lawful status to those within the program.

DACA had nearly 800,000 immigrants enrolled in the program before President Trump ended the program this week. Survey data shows that 91% of those in the DACA program were currently employed and that number goes up to 93% for those 25 and older.

While some have thought President Trump did this to open up more jobs for American citizens, it is obvious there was not much thought given to those who are currently enrolled in DACA. Now, without DACA, the enrollees have to reevaluate everything they had planned for their lives. How will they be able to work to provide for their family? How will they pay for schooling? How will they be eligible to keep their position in the military?

 

Sincerely,

AB