Category: Uncategorized

Reverse Type 2 Diabetes?

Yes, you read the title correctly. Researchers from the UK published a report in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) a couple weeks ago revealing they have had success with patients Beating Type 2 Diabetes into Remission.  Dr. Mike Lean, who co-authored the publication, spoke with an editor at the BMJ about the study which can be heard here.

Type 2 diabetes mainly stems from having excess body fat but once diagnosed, treatment usually ends at a tablet you take for the rest of your life to control your blood sugar. Very rarely do treatments take into effect the vascular issues or decreased life expectancy also experienced by those with diabetes.

So what is the miracle cure? Well as is the case for most chronic diseases, the cure is not locked inside a pill, rather within the contexts of a healthy lifestyle. A consistent exercise regimen coupled with a diet strategic to losing weight is the secret. Put simply, if you can lose weight and keep it off long enough remission can be possible.

Shockingly, they said reaching a healthy weight wasn’t the hardest part, but that maintaining a healthy weight is where people usually fail when striving to beat diabetes into remission.

So what do you think about this? As an optimistic health professional, this gives me hope for the future of our nation and globally in dealing with this chronic disease. Do you have any tips for maintaining a healthy weight? If so, share below!

 

AB

 

Emerging Emojis–the fight for a seat at the table

Do you sometimes feel like an emoji is the only way to perfectly embody the message, or the face, you are trying to convey?

It’s no secret that emojis are changing the way we communicate. They don’t just appear on our phones, either. Popularized emojis are iconic, appearing on clothing, in advertisements, and other outlets. They allow for a creation of meaning and personalization, as a readily accessible tool with which to join a dialogue.

Marla Shaivitz, a communication specialist at Johns Hopkins University’s Bloomberg School of Public Health, and Jeff Chertack, a malaria expert with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, are appealing to the Unicode Consortium–an organizing body that approves characters an emojis for standardized usage–to consider adding a female mosquito to the list of emojis that will be added to smartphones next year. Apparently, the mosquito is among a list of 67 finalists that will be further considered.

Anticipated uses of the emoji include pairing the image with other symbols–a rain cloud, for instance, to encourage people to stay dry indoors and to encourage insecticide application–or to indicate that eradication efforts are under progress. As mosquitoes are key in infectious disease transmission (for viruses including dengue, Zika, malaria, and yellow fever), a recognizable symbol might encourage more dialogue about preventative behaviors or information-seeking behaviors.

Shaivitz and Chertack make their case by estimating seven times more usage of the mosquito emoji than of the beetle emoji on Twitter. In fact, they claim there is a pretty high demand for it.

When you think about the truly random emojis that do exist, it would seem far-fetched not to include one that has the potential to actually make a  positive change. Time will tell if Unicode bites.

Sources:

http://www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-moquito-emoji-health-20170922-story.html

hhtps://ccp.jhu.edu/2017/09/18/creating-buzz-proposing-mosquito-emoji-public-health/

 

Soda warning label ordinance fizzles out

The First Amendment protects commercial speech. There are a number of associations dedicated to protecting consumer health. Sometimes, these two interests go head to head.

An ordinance recently reached the US 9th circuit court of appeals–The American Beverage Association, the California Retailers Association and the California State Outdoor Advertising Association urged the court to refuse a mandate requested by the City and County of San Francisco to put warning labels on soda. They wanted advertisements on buses, billboards, and city structures to say:

“WARNING: Drinking beverages with added sugar(s) contributes to obesity, diabetes, and tooth decay.”

The judges ruled that advertisements do not have to display the recommended warning because it “unduly burdened and chilled protected speech”. One judge wrote that targeting sodas only implied that they were more harmful in causing obesity, diabetes, and tooth decay than other products that have added sugars in them. Like these other sugary products, they are okay if consumed in moderation.

The  City of San Francisco maintains that it will continue to find ways to protect the health of its residents. It makes you wonder what the line is between promoting health and hindering speech and choice.

Sources:

http://cdn.ca9.uscourts.gov/datastore/opinions/2017/09/19/16-16072.pdf

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-soda-san-francisco-20170919-story.html

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/wireStory/appeals-court-blocks-san-francisco-warning-law-soda-49955601

THAT SHIP HAS SAILED: Why the US should stop shipping American-grown food abroad

The development of the Food for Peace program was the US’s first program for fighting international hunger. This program focuses heavily on donating commodities to vulnerable populations abroad. Most donated goods are grown domestically and shipped to developing countries where over three billion people have received assistance since its inception. It is estimated that another eight to twelve million people could receive help by reforming US food aid policies. A major barrier to expanding reach is the shipment of US agricultural goods abroad. This is a practice that should be eliminated because it is harmful in the following ways:

1. It is time-consuming.

Shipping US grown goods abroad takes on average 126 days. In emergency situations, people are only able to survive for 12 days without foods. In many instances, waiting for US commodities to ship is deadly.

2. It wastes money on transportation fees.

Between 2003 and 2012, the US spent close to $18 billion on food aid. Over half of this money was used on international transportation fees. Money that could be used to feed millions was used to support US-based shipping companies and the transport of good.

3. It cripples international agricultural sectors.

US grown food is sold at a much lower cost than food sold by local farmers. This can put local farmers out of business if they are unable to compete with the sale of US products. Resultantly, communities become completely dependent on aid.

We should discontinue the practice of shipping US commodities abroad and instead support international agricultural ventures. Learn more about FY 2016 reform proposals here.

What is DACA?

There has been a lot of buzz around “DACA” the last couple days; which has left many of us wondering, “what is DACA?” The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival program, or DACA, was enacted by the Obama Administration in June 2012. The program

The program had granted undocumented immigrant children, who entered the U.S. before their 16th birthday, a renewable two-year deportation protection and work permit while they either worked, attended school, or served in the military. However, it did not provide lawful status to those within the program.

DACA had nearly 800,000 immigrants enrolled in the program before President Trump ended the program this week. Survey data shows that 91% of those in the DACA program were currently employed and that number goes up to 93% for those 25 and older.

While some have thought President Trump did this to open up more jobs for American citizens, it is obvious there was not much thought given to those who are currently enrolled in DACA. Now, without DACA, the enrollees have to reevaluate everything they had planned for their lives. How will they be able to work to provide for their family? How will they pay for schooling? How will they be eligible to keep their position in the military?

 

Sincerely,

AB

Do you have an Advance Directive?

Everyone deserves the right to make their own decisions about their health. But sometimes we may found ourselves in certain circumstances in which we are unable to do so, such as during a coma, terminal illness, or serious injury. An important way that we can communicate our decisions during these times, however, is by having an “advance directive” in place.

Advance directives are written, legal documents that outline your decisions regarding medical care when you are unable to make them. They assist doctors and caregivers in making medical decisions on your behalf, and they can be written at any age.

There are several types of advance directives:

Health care power of attorney (also called “durable power of attorney for health care” or “health care proxy”). This is a type of advance directive in which you appoint a person you trust to make medical decisions on your behalf when you are unable to do so. This may be a family member, partner, or friend.

Living will. This is a written, legal document that outlines your wishes for certain medical or end-of-life care treatments. These may range from mechanical ventilation to tube feeding, to even organ and tissue donations.

Do-Not-Resuscitate Orders (DNR). This order informs health care providers not to perform CPR if your breathing or heart were to stop.

While advance directives are not required, it may be a good idea to have one in place so that you can have peace of mind knowing that you’re in control of your health care in the event that you are unable to make decisions for yourself.

It should be noted that state requirements regarding advance directives, such as living wills, may vary, so be sure to check your local state laws if you decide to create one for yourself. Also, be sure to keep a copy of your living will for yourself, as well as provide copies to family members, health care providers, and your health care power of attorney. Advance directives can be changed at any time, but just be sure to redistribute copies as necessary.

For more information about advance directives, check out the following resource links:

Advance Care Planning | UNC Health Care: UNC Medical Center

Living Wills and Health Care Powers of Attorney | North Carolina Bar Association

Living Wills and Advance Directives for Medical Decisions | Mayo Clinic

References:

Advance care directives. (2017, September 5). Retrieved from https://medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000472.htm

Advance directives. (2017, July 24). Retrieved from https://medlineplus.gov/advancedirectives.html#summary

Creating advance directives. (2014, November 11). Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/consumer-health/in-depth/living-wills/art-20046303?pg=2

Living wills and advance directives for medical decisions. (2014, November 11). Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/consumer-health/in-depth/living-wills/art-20046303

 

Are you accepting toxic food advice?

If you’re a health junkie or on social media at all, you’ve probably seen these terms: registered dietitian, nutritionist, nutrition coach, food guru, etc.. With so much information flying around there’s a lot of confusion over what it all means and who to listen to when it comes to nutrition advice. My answer? It all depends! All of these titles embody a love of food but there are some big differences in who to look to for food advice. Let’s set the record straight.

Registered Dietitian

Registered dietitians (RDs), also called registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs), are recognized as experts of food and nutrition in the medical field. This is largely because of the many years these professionals spend studying the science behind food and how it affects the body. The government has regulations on who can call themselves a “registered dietitian”. This is to protect the public from people who present themselves as nutrition experts, but who have no formal training. For example, if someone with diabetes accepts nutrition advice from a nutritionist and it hurts them the nutritionist can not be held accountable. Registered dietitians, on the other hand, can lose their license or suffer fines for providing poor nutrition advice.  This is because RDs go through extensive training before they can practice. As of 2017, RDs are required to complete the following:

  • a bachelor’s or advanced degree in food science or human nutrition
  • supervised training and internships
  • pass the RD exam

After RDs are certified, they also have to complete annual training to maintain their credentials. This is my field of study and the past two years I’ve spent work toward a masters in this field has not been easy, but I’m so close to the finish line! From my studies, it seems RDs are excellent in a number of areas. They really understand how to help manage medical conditions and weight loss. They also can point out what diet trends are completely bogus with science.

Nutritionists/Nutrition Coach/Food Guru

Terms like nutritionist, nutrition coach and the like are not regulated. Anyone can use these labels. This isn’t to say they don’t have valuable nutrition knowledge. Many nutritionists have a wealth of nutrition knowledge from experience and self-study. Some of my favorite nutritionist on Facebook and Instagram provide excellent recipe ideas and encourage their followers to make healthy choices with amazing food photography. On the other hand, following nutrition advice from individuals not formally trained in food science can be dangerous. A nutritionist might not fully understand nutrition information or they may be misinformed. This can be dangerous if a nutritionist misinforms a large number of individuals, especially through social media platforms. Misinformation is particularly harmful when individuals are looking to receive information around serious medical conditions like diabetes and weight loss.

The next time you’re in search of food advice think about what you need! If you have a medical condition or you’re looking for advice on how to lose weight in a healthy way, you might want to look for advice from an RD. If you’re looking for meal prepping tips or fitness inspiration, a nutritionist can certainly help. There’s space for both in this food lovers community.

Looking at the Hunter-Gatherer Gut

There are anywhere from 10-100 trillion microbes that thrive in the human body. They help maintain normal body conditions, facilitate with digestion, and are really important to our immune systems. Some of these are permanent whereas others are transient. Your own microbiota will change over the course of your life, strongly influenced by diet among other factors. An article published last week in Science magazine says these changes may even have once been seasonal.

Their logic is based on a study conducted with the Hadza community in Tanzania. These hunter-gatherers have a diet that must be much closer to that of our earliest ancestors, rooted in foraging as opposed to agriculture. The Hadza suffer much less from digestive illness–Chron’s, colitis, colon cancer–than do modern Westerners. Though the pattern of gut microbes found have yet to be more seriously researched, there seems to be health benefits of eating seasonally. Some scientists are tentatively naming this synchronization of food ingested and microbes in the gut a biorhythm of sorts.

This is certainly not the first time the hunter-gatherer diet has been looked to for inspiration. The Paleo Diet fad/trend is based in this vein of thought. It’s rich in natural proteins and fats, carbs from fruits and roots, and eliminates dairy, grains, and the cheap highly processed foods that so conveniently line our grocery stores. It has its critics certainly, but it would be interesting to see if the Paleo dieter’s microbiota is more similar to that of the Hadza.

As research in this field continues, it’ll be interesting to see how parallels in diet and its effects on the gut will continue to inform our favorite apt saying: You are what you eat.

 

Fake Health News

Fake news has been dominating headlines over the past year. Although much of the publicity has been related to politics, fake news about health may be more widespread and difficult to identify.

But what exactly is fake news?

By definition, fake news is the deliberate spread of misinformation with the intention of making political or financial gain. Ultimately it may cause individuals to make health decisions that lead to harm or suffering.

How do you identify fake news?

HealthNewsReview.org is a health news watchdog at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health that offers 10 benchmarks to evaluate the truthfulness of health care reporting.

Before taking any article at face value, ask yourself the following questions. Answering no indicates a red flag for truthfulness or accuracy.

Does the story…

  1. sufficiently discuss the costs of the health intervention?
  2. adequately quantify the benefits of the intervention?
  3. avoid exaggerating potential benefits or ignoring potential harms?
  4. acknowledge the quality of evidence?
  5. avoid over-selling or exaggerating the findings?
  6. include comment from independent sources and identify potential conflicts of interest?
  7. compare the new intervention with those already available?
  8. clearly state how available the intervention is for consumers?
  9. show what is truly new or different about the intervention?
  10. mostly repeat a news release?

Kelly McBride, vice president of the Poynter Institute, acknowledged in an article in the Atlantic – “In science, good information is really boring. Science doesn’t leap ahead the way journalists like to cover it.”

Bottom Line: If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

 

GOP Bill Halts in Senate

Remember back in May when the GOP health bill passed in the House? The momentum stopped there.
The Senate failed to pass a GOP-proposed Health Law yesterday. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says they’re going to try again early next week, though it doesn’t seem like this will be a promising attempt either. Analysts attribute this to many deep-rooted factors:  the Republican party as a whole not unified behind an action plan other than repealing the ACA, the taking away of funding and resources without a viable exchange, and a severe lack of public hearings and drafting.
Provisions included in a draft of the bill last week including capping funding for Medicaid, and giving states the power to opt out of insurance regulations substantiated in the Affordable Care Act. This fielded much opposition from more moderate Republicans. They cite problems  such as too “deep cuts” to Medicaid, and an insufficient means to account for the expenses of changing the insurance system. This opposition was especially strong in Republican states like Ohio that had expanded Medicaid under the ACA.
Now, Republican Senators are working on re-drafting a “repeal and delay” bill that would phase out aspects of the ACA over a two year time frame–a version of this bill passed in 2015. Of note, the draft of this bill to be debated does not include an amendment proposed by Senator Ted Cruz. According to a report conducted by the Department of Health and Human Services, this amendment might actually result in broader coverage and lower premiums. The quality and correctness of this report is already under great criticism by healthcare and insurance analysts.
Sources: The New York Times, Kaiser Health News