Category: Sexual Health

What you need to know about SESTA and the recent seizure of Backpage

Late last week, classified ad website Backpage.com went offline after being seized and disabled due to an “enforcement action by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the U.S. Postal Inspection Service, and the Internal Revenue Service Criminal Investigation Division”. Backpage.com is known for personal ads, and was considered by many to be the dominant online platform for sex workers to advertise their services.

Various websites have been shutting down their personal ads section in response to the Stop Enabling Sex Trafficking Act (SESTA), which has taken aim at online platforms as a playing a perceived role in sex trafficking and prostitution. While many advocates have been fighting SESTA for a large part of the year, awareness seems to be low of the laws implications among the general population.

Advocates against SESTA argue that the act will do more harm than good in regards to the safety of sex workers. Online platforms for sex work have been viewed as safer than street based sex work, allowing for screening of potential clients. Others have argued that SESTA would limit online free speech, arguing that it would require platforms to put strong restrictions on users’ speech, extending beyond the space of personal ads. If you’re interested in seeing what you can do stop SESTA, check out https://stopsesta.org for more information on how to contact your elected officials.

 

Sources – Buzzfeed News: Backpage Has Been Taken Down By The US Government And Sex Workers Aren’t Happy – https://www.buzzfeed.com/blakemontgomery/backpage-service-disruption?utm_term=.mceyodXp#.bkjAQmNK

App Grindr under scrutiny over privacy concerns

In an article published yesterday by BuzzFeed News, it was released that Gay Dating App Grindr has been sharing its users’ HIV status with two outside companies, a move which many consider dangerous to the queer community that the app claims to serve.

The sites, Apptimize and Localytics, work with Grindr to optimize the app and user experience. While it has been noted that these companies do not share information with third parties, there are still concerns with the sharing of sensitive information of a historically vulnerable population. This could raise flags for users sharing their HIV status on the app, which could negatively impact public health interventions that work to reduce HIV transmission and stigma.

Grindr recently announced that they would remind users to get tested for HIV every three to six months, offering a cue to action for users to be more aware of their HIV status. Knowing ones status is a crucial component for reducing the number of new HIV infections, such as by offering the opportunity to those who are living with HIV to be connected to care and achieve viral suppression.

 

Sources:

BuzzFeed News: Grindr Is Sharing The HIV Status Of Its Users With Other Companies –https://www.buzzfeed.com/azeenghorayshi/grindr-hiv-status-privacy?bfsplash&utm_term=.eu9v16ZaQ#.akvOQgNJj

Discrimination and Health Part I: LGBTQ+ Americans

Past research has suggested that discrimination can impact health outcomes – perhaps through vehicles such as stress of daily interactions and negative experiences with the healthcare system. One group whose experiences with discrimination can be linked to negative health outcomes is LGBTQ+ Americans. A study found that over half of LGBTQ people have experience slurs and offensive comments, and over half have been sexually harassed or experienced violence, or had an LGBTQ friend or family member experience such trauma.

We can make the connection between discrimination and trauma through various factors. One is through microaggressions –  seemingly harmless daily interactions with others who express, in this case, homophobic or transphobic views. These have been found to negatively impact health. Another is through discrimination within the healthcare system that lead LGBTQ Americans to seek healthcare less frequently. 18% of this population has avoided necessary medical care. Various forms of discrimination they face at the hands of medical professionals, police, and community members are much worse for those of color and those who are transgender.

Unfortunately, we can already see the health outcomes of discrimination to this population – they have higher rates of psychiatric disorders, substance dependence (including higher tobacco use), and suicide; lesbian women are less likely to get preventative services for cancer, and gay men are at higher risk for certain STIs.

How can we work to eliminate these gaps, even when interpersonal discrimination may take longer to tackle as our culture continues to evolve? HealthyPeople2020 provides several recommendations. First, healthcare providers should discuss sexual orientation and gender identity (SOGI) respectfully with patients, and collect data on it. Medical students should be trained in LGBTQ culturally-responsive care. In addition, we must be spokespeople against legal discrimination of this population in social services such as employment, housing, and health insurance.

Sources:

https://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topics-objectives/topic/lesbian-gay-bisexual-and-transgender-health

https://www.npr.org/documents/2017/nov/npr-discrimination-lgbtq-final.pdf

https://www.centerforhealthjournalism.org/2017/11/08/how-racism-and-microaggressions-lead-worse-health

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/microaggressions-in-everyday-life/201011/microaggressions-more-just-race

http://www.apa.org/topics/health-disparities/fact-sheet-stress.aspx

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2747726/pdf/nihms134591.pdf

Changes to HIV Criminalization Laws in NC

According to a report updated in August 2017, 34 states in the US had HIV criminalization laws still on the books, written at least twenty years ago at the height of the AIDS epidemic [1]. According to the Human Rights Campaign, 25 states in the US have “laws that criminalize behaviors that carry a low or negligible risk of HIV transmission” [2]. Most of these laws require disclosure of HIV status for those living with HIV, and in some states, failure to disclose or follow other laws could result in a felony.

There are various examples of these laws being put to work, including a man living with HIV being convicted of a felony and sentenced for 35 years for spitting on a police officer because his saliva was considered a deadly weapon though HIV transmission doesn’t occur through saliva [3].

In North Carolina, HIV criminalization laws are contained in the health code, and the North Carolina Commission for Public Health recently voted to update the laws in order to better reflect our current understanding of HIV and the current methods available for HIV treatment and prevention [4].

According to the previous law, any individual living with HIV was required to disclose their HIV status to any sexual partners and to use a condom during sex, and anyone living with HIV was unable to donate organs. With the changes to the law, an HIV positive individual who is virally suppressed for at least 6 months does not have to disclose their HIV status to sexual partners or use a condom during sex, and even if they aren’t virally suppressed, if their partner is taking PrEP, they don’t have to use a condom. Also, an individual living with HIV doesn’t have to use a condom when having sex with another individual living with HIV, and individuals living with HIV can donate organs to other individuals living with HIV [5]

This is an exciting step forward for North Carolina that will hopefully make changes for HIV stigma while also representing current options for HIV treatment and prevention. These changes also recognize that HIV is an ongoing issue, especially with high rates of new diagnoses of HIV in the South.

Nonetheless, some activists are still worried that this is only a step forward for those who are already at an advantage. Many individuals are still unable to access healthcare and the medical system for various reasons, limiting their access to PrEP for HIV treatment to attain viral suppression. Only 50% of individuals living with HIV stay in care. Further, Black and Latinx individuals still receive worse care and have less access to care. This results in a continued disparity. Though the changes to these laws are a step forward in creating evidence-based laws and hopefully decreasing stigma and unjust prosecution, there are still significant barriers for individuals seeking HIV treatment and prevention care [6].

“Chart: State-by-State Criminal Laws Used to Prosecute People with HIV, Center for HIV Law and Policy (2017).” The Center for HIV Law and Policy, 1 Aug. 2017, www.hivlawandpolicy.org/resources/chart-state-state-criminal-laws-used-prosecute-people-hiv-center-hiv-law-and-policy-2012

Jackson, Hope. “A Look At HIV Criminalization Bills Across The Country.” Human Rights Campaign, 26 Feb. 2018, www.hrc.org/blog/a-look-at-hiv-criminalization-bills-across-the-country.

Kovach, Gretel C. “Prison for Man With H.I.V. Who Spit on a Police Officer.” The New York Times, The New York Times, 16 May 2008, www.nytimes.com/2008/05/16/us/16spit.html.

Adeleke, Christina. “Choose Science over Fear.” QNotes, 24 Feb. 2018, goqnotes.com/58326/choose-science-over-fear/.

“HIV Criminalization Laws Change in North Carolina.” WNCAP, 20 Feb. 2018, wncap.org/2018/02/20/hiv-criminalization-laws-change-north-carolina/

Salzman, Sony. “Updated HIV Laws May Only Protect the Privileged.” Tonic, 20 Mar. 2018, tonic.vice.com/en_us/article/wj7e9z/updated-hiv-laws-may-only-protect-privileged.

What’s going on with the HPV vaccine?

HPV is the most common STI, and 9 of every 10 people will have an infection at some point in their lives (1).  This virus can cause cancers in the cervix, penis, mouth, and oropharynx (2), and it also causes genital warts (3).  Even though a vaccine exists against HPV, less than half of teens are up to date on all of their doses of these shots (2).

Part of the reason behind these low vaccination rates are due to parents concerns regarding vaccine safety and fear that vaccination will encourage sexual activity (4).  Though all vaccines, including this one, have potential side effects, the HPV vaccine is considered safe (4). Additionally, studies have shown that the HPV vaccine does not make teens more likely to start having sex (4).

The way providers approach talking about the HPV has also influenced vaccine rates, and strong provider endorsement seems to improve vaccinations (5).  On Monday, March 19, Chris Noronha spoke with the Interdisciplinary Health Communications Class about the work he is doing with Noel Brewer on provider communication regarding the HPV vaccine.  They have found that when providers mention the HPV vaccine in the same list as other vaccines that are due at age 11, vaccination rates increase.

If you’re interested in the HPV vaccine, it may not be too late.  You can receive the series through age 26 (1).  Contact your provider if you’re interested.

 

Works Cited
  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine Safety. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [Online] January 30, 2018. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccinesafety/vaccines/hpv-vaccine.html.
  2. Aubrey, Allison. This Vaccine Can Prevent Cancer, But Many Teenagers Still Don’t Get It. National Public Radio. [Online] February 19, 2018. https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/02/19/586494027/this-vaccine-can-prevent-cancer-but-many-teenagers-still-dont-get-it.
  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. What is HPV. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [Online] December 20, 2016. https://www.cdc.gov/hpv/parents/whatishpv.html.
  4. —. Talking to Parents About HPV vaccine. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [Online] December 2016. https://www.cdc.gov/hpv/hcp/for-hcp-tipsheet-hpv.pdf.
  5. Narula, Tara. HPV vaccine: Why aren’t children getting it? CBS News. [Online] July 23, 2017. https://www.cbsnews.com/news/hpv-vaccination-cancer-prevention-dr-tara-narula/.

 

 

How many teens are sexting?

When we go on the internet and listen to stories, we often hear comments about sexting among teens.  With all of this talk, it may sound like this is something that all teens are doing.  However, according to a study published this week by JAMA Pediatrics, only about 14.8% of teens have sent these messages, and approximately 27.4% of teens have received a sext [1].  This means that roughly 17 out of 20 teens have never sent sexually explicit images, videos, or messages.

Though this rate is lower than we may have expected, sexting is becoming more commonplace, and that is cause for concern. Many teens, view sexting as private and therefore safe.  However, approximately 12%, are forwarding sexts without consent of the sender [1]. Additionally, many teens don’t realize that even though some messaging apps that allow video and image sharing appear private, they may not be [2].

Often times, sexting is a normal by-product of teens trying to establish their identities and wanting to explore their sexuality [2].  However, many teens just are not aware of the dangers that can come with sexting.  Along with these concerns, teens just need to be reminded that it’s not OK for them to be pressured to share more of their bodies than they’re comfortable, and that consent is theirs to give.

[1]  Madigan, S., Ly, A., & Rash, C. L. (2018, February 26). Prevalence of Multiple Forms of Sexting Behavior Among Youth. Journal of the American Medical Association Pediatrics. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2017.5314

[2]  Gabriel, E. (2018, February 26). 1 in 4 young people has been sexted, study finds. Retrieved from CNN: https://www.cnn.com/2018/02/26/health/youth-sexting-prevalence-study/index.html

Achieving Health Equity and Justice through the Reproductive Justice Framework: keynote by Monica Raye Simpson

This past Friday marked the 39th annual Minority Health Conference, which is the largest and longest run student-led health conference in the world. This year’s 20th annual William T. Small Jr. keynote speaker was Monica Raye Simpson, who is the executive director of SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective, gave a keynote address titled: “Achieving Health Equity and Justice through the Reproductive Justice Framework”. In the talk, Simpson gave an energetic and powerful where she gave a history of the Reproductive Justice framework, and how her own life experiences shaped how she approaches her work. One of her main points was how the Reproductive Justice Framework’s focus on centering those who are the most marginalized is critical for the field of Public Health, in order to overcome health inequities. In case you were not able to attend the event in person, the keynote speech is available for broadcast in the link below, moderated by yours truly.

Sources: https://sph.unc.edu/sph-webcast/2018-02-23_mhc/

HIV Medication Adherence Apps: Challenges Faced

By Chunyan Li

The success of HIV medications has changed HIV from a fatal disease to a chronic illness. However, like other chronic diseases that require lifetime medication (at least for now), maintaining good adherence to antiretroviral therapy is not easy for HIV-positive people for reasons such as the complex drug regimens, strict requirements on the time of daily medication, and sometimes intolerable side effects. Having a mobile phone-based application to remind patients of daily medication is a good way out, but the effectiveness of such medication adherence apps remains less studied.

One significant challenge that such apps often face is a lack of behavioral science in design. Some experts described the development of many healthcare apps as a “black box”[1], blaming that app developers often focus too much on technology while neglecting behavior change theories or research evidence. One 2016 research study [2] reviewed all health apps on Google Play, Apple App Store and Windows Phone Store, and found that the reviewed 28 eligible health apps only used 5.6 out of the total 37 behavioral change principles on average. Among the four categories of behavior change principles proposed by the researchers (task support, dialogue support, system credibility and social support), the most used principles were about “system credibility” and “task support”, including features like surface credibility, expertise, authority, and providing general information and function of self-monitoring.  The two categories “dialogue support” and “social support”, which require higher user-provider interactivity and more constructive design based on behavioral science, are somehow neglected.

In another systematic review [3] that reviewed all eHealth-based HIV intervention studies (including smartphone-, Web- and general Internet-based interventions), 10 out of the 14 studies that had a component of adherence improvement were smartphone-based. As HIV patients are usually required to take medicines on quite a strict daily schedule, and sometimes even to be in private if HIV/AIDS is heavily stigmatized, smartphone-based apps are better for portability and privacy protection. However, it could also be challenged when people feel unsafe to disclose HIV status or worry about leaving digital footprints on such apps. In lower-income settings where cell phones are shared with family members, using apps to keep track of medication adherence might not be an ideal option for HIV-positive people.

In a qualitative research study about the HIV treatment continuum that I’m recently working on, a frequently-mentioned desired feature of app-based interventions by HIV-positive people is having communication with human counselors. Many adherence apps may have functions of knowledge education, tracking medications and pushing reminders, but lack an emotional support. Living with HIV is a chronic and multidimensional (physical, psychological and cultural) stress, and a successful coping with such a stress requires consistent support from families, friends and health professionals. Though the advantages of health apps include its mass-reach to users and increasing access to care in limited-resource settings, we should never ignore the needs for human caring and support. How to incorporate human support into HIV medication adherence apps could be one of the future research directions.

 

[1] Tomlinson, M., Rotheram-Borus, M. J., Swartz, L., & Tsai, A. C. (2013). Scaling Up mHealth: Where Is the Evidence? PLoS Medicine, 10(2). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1001382

[2] Geuens, J., Swinnen, T. W., Westhovens, R., de Vlam, K., Geurts, L., & Vanden Abeele, V. (2016). A Review of Persuasive Principles in Mobile Apps for Chronic Arthritis Patients: Opportunities for Improvement. JMIR mHealth and uHealth, 4(4), e118. https://doi.org/10.2196/mhealth.6286

[3] Muessig, K. E., Nekkanti, M., Bauermeister, J., Bull, S., & Hightow-Weidman, L. B. (2015). A Systematic Review of Recent Smartphone, Internet and Web 2.0 Interventions to Address the HIV Continuum of Care. Current HIV/AIDS Reports. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11904-014-0239-3

 

A Queer Health Reading List

The following is a list of books and articles related to queer health that might be useful for some individuals interested in the topic. The list is by no means exhaustive.

HIV:

  1. Race, K. (2016). Reluctant Objects Sexual Pleasure as a Problem for HIV Biomedical Prevention. GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies22(1), 1-31.
  2. Gonzalez, O. R. (2010). Tracking the bugchaser: Giving the gift of HIV/AIDS. Cultural Critique75(1), 82-113.

Research & Infrastructures:

  1. Nguyen, V. K. (2009). Government-by-exception: Enrolment and experimentality in mass HIV treatment programmes in Africa. Social Theory & Health7(3), 196-217.
  2. Murphy, M. (2017). The economization of life. Duke University Press.

Regarding MSM:

  1. Boellstorff, T. (2011). But do not identify as gay: A proleptic genealogy of the MSM category. Cultural Anthropology26(2), 287-312.
  2. Young, R. M., & Meyer, I. H. (2005). The trouble with “MSM” and “WSW”: Erasure of the sexual-minority person in public health discourse. American journal of public health95(7), 1144-1149.

Medical interventions:

  1. Epstein, Steven. 2010. “The great undiscussable: Anal cancer, HPV, and gay men’s health.” In Three shots at prevention: The HPV vaccine and the politics of medicine’s simple solutions, edited by Keith Wailoo, Julie Livingston, Steven Epstein, and Robert Aronowitz. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, pp. 61 -90.
  2. Blackwell, Courtney, Jeremy Birnholtz, and Charles Abbott. 2014. Seeing and being seen: Co-situation and impression formation using Grindr, a location-aware gay dating app. New Media & Society: 1461444814521595.

Precarity:

  1. Butler, J. (2006). Precarious life: The powers of mourning and violence. Verso.

PrEP:

  1. Fiereck, K. J. (2015). Cultural Conundrums: The Ethics of Epidemiology and the Problems of Population in Implementing Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis. Developing World Bioethics15(1), 27–39. http://doi.org/10.1111/dewb.12034
  2. Singh, J. A., & Mills, E. J. (2005). The Abandoned Trials of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis for HIV: What Went Wrong? PLoS Medicine2(9), e234. http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.0020234
  3. Calabrese, S. K., Earnshaw, V. A., Underhill, K., Hansen, N. B., & Dovidio, J. F. (2014). The Impact of Patient Race on Clinical Decisions Related to Prescribing HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP): Assumptions About Sexual Risk Compensation and Implications for Access. AIDS Behav, 18(2), 226-240. doi:10.1007/s10461-013-0675-x
  4. Calabrese, S. K., Magnus, M., Mayer, K. H., Krakower, D. S., Eldahan, A. I., Hawkins, L. A. G., . . . Dovidio, J. F. (2017). “Support Your Client at the Space That They’re in”: HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Prescribers’ Perspectives on PrEP-Related Risk Compensation. AIDS Patient Care STDS, 31(4), 196-204. doi:10.1089/apc.2017.0002
  5. Calabrese, S. K., & Underhill, K. (2015). How Stigma Surrounding the Use of HIV Preexposure Prophylaxis Undermines Prevention and Pleasure: A Call to Destigmatize “Truvada Whores”. Am J Public Health, 105(10), 1960-1964. doi:10.2105/ajph.2015.302816
  6. Dumit, J. (2012). Drugs for life: how pharmaceutical companies define our health. Duke University Press.

Trans health:

  1. Plemons, E. D. (2014). It is as it does: Genital form and function in sex reassignment surgery. Journal of Medical Humanities35(1), 37-55.
  2. Preciado, Paul Beatriz. 2013. Testo junkie: Sex, drugs, and biopolitics in the pharmacopornographic era. New York: The Feminist Press at CUNY. (End of “The Micropolitics of Gender,” pp. 365 – 398).
  3. Spade, Dean. 2006. “Mutilating Gender.” In The Transgender Studies Reader, edited by Susan Stryker and Stephen Wittle. New York: Routledge, 315-32.
  4. Currah, Paisley. 2008. Expecting bodies: the pregnant man and transgender exclusion from the Employment Non-Discrimination Act. Women’s Studies Quarterly, 36(3&4).
  5. Crawford, Lucas Cassidy. 2008. Transgender without organs? Mobilizing a geo-affective theory of gender modification. WSQ: Women’s Studies Quarterly, 36(3&4): 127-43.
  6. Butler, J. (2001). Doing justice to someone: Sex reassignment and allegories of transsexuality. GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies7(4), 621-636.
  7. Karaian, Lara. 2013. Pregnant men: Repronormativity, critical trans theory and the re (conceive)ing of sex and pregnancy in law. Social & Legal Studies: 0964663912474862.

Critical Disability Studies:

  1. McRuer, R., & Wilkerson, A. L. (Eds.). (2003). Desiring disability: Queer theory meets disability studies. Duke University Press.
  2. Cheslack-Postava, Keely, and Rebecca M. Jordan-Young. 2012. Autism spectrum disorders: toward a gendered embodiment model. Social science & medicine 74(11): 1667-1674.
  3. Jack, Jordynn. 2011. The Extreme Male Brain? Incrementum and the Rhetorical Gendering of Autism. Disability Studies Quarterly 31(3). http://dsq-sds.org/article/view/1672/1599
  4. Garland-Thomson, R. (2005). Feminist disability studies. Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society30(2), 1557-1587.
  5. Shakespeare, T. (2006). The social model of disability. The disability studies reader2, 197-204.
  6. Breckenridge, C. A., & Vogler, C. A. (2001). The critical limits of embodiment: Disability’s criticism. Public Culture13(3), 349-357.

Masculinity & health:

  1. MacLeish, Kenneth T. 2012. Armor and anesthesia: exposure, feeling, and the soldier’s body. Medical anthropology quarterly 26(1): 49-68.
  2. Oudshoorn, Nelly. 2000. “Imagined men: Representations of masculinities in discourses on male contraceptive technology.” In Bodies of technology: Women’s involvement with reproductive medicine, edited by Ann Rudinow Saetnan, Nelly Oudshoorn, and Marta Kirejczyk. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 123-45.
  3. Serlin, David. 2006. “Disability, masculinity, and the prosthetics of war, 1945 to 2005.” In The prosthetic impulse: From a posthuman present to a biocultural future, edited by Marquard Smith and Joanne Mora. Cambridge: The MIT Press, 155-86.
  4. Shakespeare, T. (1999). The sexual politics of disabled masculinity. Sexuality and disability17(1), 53-64.

Gender theory, race, and reproductive health:

  1. Waggoner, Miranda R. 2015. Cultivating the maternal future: Public health and the prepregnant self.” Signs 40(4): 939-962.
  2. Franklin, Sarah. 2013. Biological Relatives: IVF, Stem Cells, and the Future of Kinship. Durham: Duke University Press. (“Miracle Babies” and “Reproductive Technologies,” pp. 31 – 67 and 150 – 84).
  3. Murphy, M. (2012). Seizing the means of reproduction: Entanglements of feminism, health, and technoscience. Duke University Press.
  4. Roberts, Dorothy E. Killing the black body: Race, reproduction, and the meaning of liberty. Vintage Books, 1999.
  5. Bridges, Khiara. 2011. Reproducing race: An ethnography of pregnancy as a site of racialization. Berkeley: The University of California Press. (“The Production of Unruly Bodies” and “The ‘primitive pelvis,’ racial folklore, and atavism in contemporary forms of medical disenfranchisement,” pp. 74 – 100 and 103-43).

Adam Rippon: America’s Olympic Sweetheart

During the 2018 Winter Olympics that have been happening in Pyeongchang, South Korea, American Figure Skater Adam Rippon has stolen the hearts and minds of many, including this writer. But beyond his charming persona and impressive skating abilities, Rippon has brought visibility to other queer athletes by being the first openly gay athlete to compete in the Games.

Rippon presents by what is defined as stereotypically gay: often using more “feminine” mannerisms and speaking with what can be called the “gay lisp”. At the same time, he is being praised not just for his personality and looks, but also his athleticism, a praise that is often withheld from gay men who do not present in ways that are more heteronormative.

I look forward to seeing what other heights Rippon can reach, and what he will continue to do with the platform that he has amassed. If you’re interested in more reading on this topic, I would highly recommend the article below.

Sources:

them. How a Fabulous, Femme Gay Man Finally Became America’s Sweetheart – https://www.them.us/story/how-a-femme-gay-man-became-americas-new-sweetheart