Category: Lifestyle

Spring Has Sprung

Despite the random snow Chapel Hill was bestowed with Saturday night, it is spring! And with springtime comes budding flowers, active squirrels, and longer days of sunshine. Winter blues, be gone.

Kickstart your spring renewal with the produce that comes into season:

Fruits

Apricots (May—July)

Blackberries (May—October)

Blueberries (May—August)

Cherries (April—July)

Nectarines (May—October)

Peaches (May—October)

Plums (May—November)

Raspberries (May—November)

Rhubarb (April—July)

Strawberries (March—November)

Vegetables

Artichokes (March—June)

Celery (April—December)

Fava beans (March—July)

Peas (April—November)

Purslane (April—November)

Shallots (May—July)

Harvest yourself some fun with a healthy spring day activity. Check out your local farmers’ market:

Chapel Hill Farmers’ Market

Carrboro Farmers’ Market

Durham Farmers’ Market

South Durham Farmers’ Market

Perkins Orchard

Spring clean:

  • Swap heavy blankets and flannel bedding for breathable cotton sheets
  • Vacuum (spring allergies may start acting up)
  • Remember to treat pets with tick/flea/heartworm medication
  • Schedule those appointments you need to schedule
  • Organize your desk to dominate this last half of the semester

Happy spring!

“The Angelina Effect”

In this day of age celebrities dominate our world. They hold elected office, they are activists, they are social media entrepreneurs, they are everywhere. Whether we like to believe it or not they have influence over our behaviors and how we make decisions. I’m guilty that most of the accounts I follow on Instagram are former Bachelor contestants and catch myself wanting to mimic their fashion and fitness routines. In fact, there has been research that has examined this phenomenon. Back in 2013, esteemed actress Angelina Jolie announced that she carries the a genetic mutation that greatly increases your risk of breast and ovarian cancer (BRCA1). In her New York Times opt ed piece, Jolie reveals that she lost her mom, aunt and grandmother to cancer and that influence her decision to undergo preventive surgery to remove both of her breasts (mastectomy) and ovaries. After this announcement, several researchers explored what came to be known as “The Angelina Effect” and how her decision influenced other women’s decisions about their own health. In a study published in Health Services Research journal, hospital data from both New York and the UK revealed that three months after Jolie’s announcement there was a significant increase in preventive mastectomies prior to the announcement. This trend has been seen with other celebrities after announcements of diagnoses and provides incentives for both public figures and healthcare providers to use these instances as teachable moments and bring awareness to employ preventive healthcare.

To learn more about the BRCA1 gene visit the following site: https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/genetics/brca-fact-sheet#q1

 

 

 

“If your mother says she loves you, check it out”, Stephanie Brown’s guide to identifying false new stories

On Monday, our class had the pleasure of hearing UNC’s own Stephanie Brown discuss her most recent article “New Stories Credible or Clickable: Schema of Fake News to Corrections” featured in Communication: Journalism Education Today. Stephanie Brown is the director of the Parks Library at UNC’s School of Media and Journalism and is expert in news literacy and how to detect false news. Her presentation focused on the best ways to detect if an article is considered credible or in today’s newly coined phrase “fake news”. She began her presentation with an exercise “Would you share” to get our class thinking about the creditability of articles and if we would feel comfortable sharing them on our own social media platforms. This lively discussion brought up some of the consequences of sharing inaccurate news information and how we go addressing others who share these types of stories. Then she moved on how ways to identify articles that are “fake news” and unreliable sources through a comprehensive checklist. She went through the checklist with a few example articles that captive our class’s attention. The checklist was originally developed by the News Literacy Project and includes about seven items. A few examples of the items on the checklist include looking out for articles that are overly emotional, that use excessive punctuation, make a claim about a secret that the media is hiding from you and the types of sources the article cites. One interesting item on the checklist that she harped on was looking at the advertisements and sponsored content on the sides of the article. That can be a telling item if the advertisement is featuring “Lose 5 lbs in a week with this new pill” vs. “Visit Florida” in determining the credibility of the content.

Here is the full News Literacy project checklist: http://www.thenewsliteracyproject.org/sites/default/files/DontGetFooled_FINAL_020518.pdf

 

How many teens are sexting?

When we go on the internet and listen to stories, we often hear comments about sexting among teens.  With all of this talk, it may sound like this is something that all teens are doing.  However, according to a study published this week by JAMA Pediatrics, only about 14.8% of teens have sent these messages, and approximately 27.4% of teens have received a sext [1].  This means that roughly 17 out of 20 teens have never sent sexually explicit images, videos, or messages.

Though this rate is lower than we may have expected, sexting is becoming more commonplace, and that is cause for concern. Many teens, view sexting as private and therefore safe.  However, approximately 12%, are forwarding sexts without consent of the sender [1]. Additionally, many teens don’t realize that even though some messaging apps that allow video and image sharing appear private, they may not be [2].

Often times, sexting is a normal by-product of teens trying to establish their identities and wanting to explore their sexuality [2].  However, many teens just are not aware of the dangers that can come with sexting.  Along with these concerns, teens just need to be reminded that it’s not OK for them to be pressured to share more of their bodies than they’re comfortable, and that consent is theirs to give.

[1]  Madigan, S., Ly, A., & Rash, C. L. (2018, February 26). Prevalence of Multiple Forms of Sexting Behavior Among Youth. Journal of the American Medical Association Pediatrics. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2017.5314

[2]  Gabriel, E. (2018, February 26). 1 in 4 young people has been sexted, study finds. Retrieved from CNN: https://www.cnn.com/2018/02/26/health/youth-sexting-prevalence-study/index.html

Dear Apple, Keep doing what you are doing

The new Apple Watch commercial “Dear Apple” has the world talking after its debut during this year’s Winter Olympics. It’s personal, heart wrenching and most importantly highlights the incredible impacts of it’s less advertised features. This commercial emphasizes that this technology could revolutionize healthcare and provide life-changing health support. It features anecdotes of a car accident survivor using the feature on the watch to call 911 after their phone was thrown from the vehicle and a child with Type 1 diabetes pairing the watch with her glucose monitor that alerts her when her blood sugars are at low levels. While the ad still features its more traditional feature of tracking physical activity, it was nice to see that the more innovative features of its products and it’s direct benefits. While I love a good selfie, it’s reassuring to know that Apple and other technology companies are using their technology for just more than just three dimensional emojis and higher quality selfies. I look forward to seeing what other technology these companies come up with in the future to help us lead healthier lives.

If you haven’t seen the commercial check it out here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N-x8Ik9G5Dg

 

 

Teens for Gun Reform Make Their White House Appearance

The events that occurred at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkside, Florida last week have sparked the gun control debate yet again in the United States. To me the past week has felt a little like déjà vu: Sandy Hook, Route 91 Festival and Pulse nightclub shootings. Thinking even farther back to Columbine shooting in 1997 when a school shooting seemed unthinkable and how that has changed to be almost a predictable occurrence today. Each shooting seems to spark the same cycle of outcry among our nation with folks pressuring change from policymakers. Yet each time there is no change from the people in power. A few weeks go by and there is another story that captives our attention and it is pushed to the back of our minds until the next shooting occurs and the cycle begins again. However one group is attempting to stop this hopeless cycle: Teens for Gun Reform.

Teens for Gun Reform is a student run group that appeared in front of the White House on Monday. They prepared a “silent lie-in” demonstration of 17 members lying down for three minutes in the streets in front of the White House (the amount of time it took the gunman to take the lives of the students and teachers). Around a hundred students and other advocates rallied and protested following the demonstration. These students are standing up for what they believe needs to be changed since policymakers aren’t listening to anyone else. It’s their lives that are in danger and hopefully protests and pressures from this group will lead to change regarding gun control.

To learn more about this group and the protest visit the following sites:

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/us-politics/gun-control-lie-in-white-house-parkland-florida-shooting-donald-trump-protest-students-a8218686.html

https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2018/02/19/587089773/teens-lie-in-at-white-house-to-protest-for-stronger-gun-control

Adam Rippon: America’s Olympic Sweetheart

During the 2018 Winter Olympics that have been happening in Pyeongchang, South Korea, American Figure Skater Adam Rippon has stolen the hearts and minds of many, including this writer. But beyond his charming persona and impressive skating abilities, Rippon has brought visibility to other queer athletes by being the first openly gay athlete to compete in the Games.

Rippon presents by what is defined as stereotypically gay: often using more “feminine” mannerisms and speaking with what can be called the “gay lisp”. At the same time, he is being praised not just for his personality and looks, but also his athleticism, a praise that is often withheld from gay men who do not present in ways that are more heteronormative.

I look forward to seeing what other heights Rippon can reach, and what he will continue to do with the platform that he has amassed. If you’re interested in more reading on this topic, I would highly recommend the article below.

Sources:

them. How a Fabulous, Femme Gay Man Finally Became America’s Sweetheart – https://www.them.us/story/how-a-femme-gay-man-became-americas-new-sweetheart

It doesn’t beep at the backseat

In 1993, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration launched the catchy “Click It or Ticket” campaign to increase seat belt usage by emphasizing the legal consequences of “freeriding” (which is also catchy and I just coined). The campaign was considered largely successful.

In our 21st century, the CDC puts 18-24 year olds as less likely to wear seat belts than older age groups, especially in the backseat. I painfully point out that these youths were likely not cognizant, maybe not even born yet, at the height of “Click It or Ticket.” It may be time for a reboot.

Enter “Buckle Up, Backseat,” a campaign idea to increase seat belt usage in backseat passengers. Tyler Lee, a first-year master’s student studying Strategic Communication, was kind enough to present this proposal to our class today. He described how a strong focus would be on ridesharing vehicles (like Uber, Lyft, or your average taxi) since they are widely used by 18-24 year olds. Tyler and team’s formative research found that attitudes on backseat passenger seat belt usage were notably laxer when in the context of rideshares.

So don’t “freeride” (wink wink, trademark pending), and instead remember to “Click It or Ticket” and “Buckle Up, Backseat.” Catchy phrases have power.

 

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/motorvehiclesafety/seatbelts/facts.html

SNAPFresh Without the Fresh

This week the Trump administration released their proposed change to the longstanding SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) which some would equate to delivery meal services such as HelloFresh, Blue Apron and Purple Carrot. These new delivery meal services have been tremendously popular and my first reaction was this might actually be a good idea. This type of service is more convenient and having groceries delivered without the hassle of going to a grocery store would be a nice perk for program shoppers. I further explored the details of this program and my mind quickly changed when I read about what was included in the boxes and more importantly what was not. These boxes would not contain fresh foods (milk, eggs, fruits and vegetables) and instead would provide canned fruits and vegetables and shelf milk. To be honest I had to do a quick web search to see what was actually shelf milk. Additionally, these Americans would have little to no say over what is included in the boxes versus the current program where they are issued a card and can purchase what they choose to at participating stores. While I could see benefit in this type of service as an OPTION for SNAP shoppers there is a lot of improvements that should be made before bringing this proposed idea into actual implementation particularly thinking about the foods included and would this truly be something that current SNAP shoppers find feasible and/or pragmatic.

References

https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2018/02/12/585130274/trump-administration-wants-to-decide-what-food-snap-recipients-will-get?utm_campaign=storyshare&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social

Love is all you need (that, and chocolate)

Hypothetically speaking of course, if one had no plans at all for this Wednesday and/or if that same someone muttered, “What’s this Wednesday,” one might recommend a day of self-care. Hallmark be darned! Regardless of plan status (or, you know, relationship status), self-love can be every day. I’m talking about healthy, happy choices.

Take a soak in the tub of love

Sprinkle some rose petals and rose water in there for some antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and moisturizing action. Or pour in a glass of red wine! The polyphenols soften skin and antioxidants give you a boost.

Flavonoids

Get you some dark chocolate. It’s high in iron, magnesium, and feel-good phenylethylamine. One to two ounces should do the trick.

Hit some zzz’s right in the bullseye with Cupid’s arrow

Pro tip: Sleeping naked helps the body regulate its temperature, which in turn helps decrease the stress hormone cortisol and balance melatonin.

 

If that’s not a romantic evening of self-care, I don’t know what is. Enjoy!