Category: Interpersonal Communication

Impostor Experience: The Advice I Keep Giving Myself in Graduate School

Impostor experience is characterized as having an inability to internalize one’s accomplishments, where those who experience it feel that they are a fraud, that they have somehow deceived others to believe that they are smarter than they actually are. These feelings occur even when contradicted by success, often crediting luck or good timing over their own hard work and effort. And it is quite prevalent in academic spaces.

When I started my graduate career, I was lucky enough to have professors who were well aware of this topic, encouraging students to reach out when they needed to, reminding us that we all have expertise to contribute to the classroom, we all have a space.

As a first generation college student, I still have moments almost daily where I feel like I don’t belong, that this isn’t really the place for me. Sometimes it’s a simple comment, someone in class sharing an experience, like “Oh my dad’s a doctor”. Don’t get me wrong, my parents are two of the hardest working people I know. But there are constantly reminders for me that in pursuing a graduate degree, I’m taking a career path that not many people who knew me as a child could even imagine.

Below I’ve attached some resources that I have found particularly helpful at some low points in my academic career. But what has helped the most for me is opening up to my friends and classmates, and realizing that I am not the only one having these feelings. I’m writing this because I’m not perfect at taking my own advice, I still need to step back and use some of these strategies, and I still need to practice opening up when I’m struggling.

Sources:

APA Cover Story: Feel like a fraud? http://www.apa.org/gradpsych/2013/11/fraud.aspx

The Chronicle of Higher Education: Impostor Syndrome is Definitely a Thing: http://www.chronicle.com/article/Impostor-Syndrome-Is/238418

Emerging Emojis–the fight for a seat at the table

Do you sometimes feel like an emoji is the only way to perfectly embody the message, or the face, you are trying to convey?

It’s no secret that emojis are changing the way we communicate. They don’t just appear on our phones, either. Popularized emojis are iconic, appearing on clothing, in advertisements, and other outlets. They allow for a creation of meaning and personalization, as a readily accessible tool with which to join a dialogue.

Marla Shaivitz, a communication specialist at Johns Hopkins University’s Bloomberg School of Public Health, and Jeff Chertack, a malaria expert with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, are appealing to the Unicode Consortium–an organizing body that approves characters an emojis for standardized usage–to consider adding a female mosquito to the list of emojis that will be added to smartphones next year. Apparently, the mosquito is among a list of 67 finalists that will be further considered.

Anticipated uses of the emoji include pairing the image with other symbols–a rain cloud, for instance, to encourage people to stay dry indoors and to encourage insecticide application–or to indicate that eradication efforts are under progress. As mosquitoes are key in infectious disease transmission (for viruses including dengue, Zika, malaria, and yellow fever), a recognizable symbol might encourage more dialogue about preventative behaviors or information-seeking behaviors.

Shaivitz and Chertack make their case by estimating seven times more usage of the mosquito emoji than of the beetle emoji on Twitter. In fact, they claim there is a pretty high demand for it.

When you think about the truly random emojis that do exist, it would seem far-fetched not to include one that has the potential to actually make a  positive change. Time will tell if Unicode bites.

Sources:

http://www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-moquito-emoji-health-20170922-story.html

hhtps://ccp.jhu.edu/2017/09/18/creating-buzz-proposing-mosquito-emoji-public-health/

 

Narrative Reconstruction: a Lesson we can learn from Taylor Swift

This past Sunday, Taylor Swift premiered the music video for her latest single, Look What You Made Me Do, at the MTV Video Music Awards. The video went viral upon release, and subsequently has been the subject of a number of internet think pieces breaking down the star’s critiques on different personas of herself in the public eye over the course of her career. In case you missed it, you can find it here.

 But beyond providing a tongue in cheek look into the perceptions of a widely successful pop artist, the idea of reconstructing narratives for self-affirmation can be key to those who have suffered previous traumatic experiences.

 A study recently published in Qualitative Social Work studied the effect of narrative construction, or having an organized and logical story of their previous traumatic experiences, along with a clear sense of self throughout and a sense of how that experience has shaped them. They found that compared to those who had not constructed a narrative, those with a higher level of narrative construction noted an increased acceptance of their experiences, and being more likely to perceive life experiences as positive and significant. Those with an elevated sense of narrative construction credited their success to strategies such as reflective writing, informal conversations with supportive friends and family, and seeking professional help such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.

But often, the stressors of daily life are somewhere between trauma and celebrity feud. As summer is ending and the school year here again, it’s a great time to begin to regularly process emotions, especially with the seemingly constant stream of news and celebrity gossip. With September being Self-Awareness month, taking the time for some reflective journaling, or simply maintaining a strong support system of friends and family can set you up for success. If you feel like talking to a professional, the university has wonderful Counseling and Psychological Services, with walk in services regularly available. Beyond that, if you need additional help for figuring out to find a therapist, or if you’re curious about what therapy could look like, check out this article published by the New York Times – How to Find the Right Therapist.

 

For CAPS Walk-In Services:

Go to the 3rd floor of the Campus Health Services Building.

MON-THURS: 9 am – noon or 1 pm – 4 pm

FRI: 9:30 am – noon or 1 pm – 4 pm.

 

Sources-

Qualitative Social Work: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1473325016656046

New York Times Article: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/17/smarter-living/how-to-find-the-right-therapist.html?mcubz=1&_r=0

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month

By: Aria Gray MPH: Maternal and Child Health candidate 2017

What is Domestic Violence? Domestic violence is the willful intimidation, physical assault, battery, sexual assault, or other abusive behavior as part of a systematic pattern of power and control perpetrated by one intimate partner against another. It can include physical violence, sexual violence, psychological violence, and emotional abuse. Domestic violence affects individuals in every community regardless of age, economic status, sexual orientation, gender, or other demographic factors. However, domestic violence is most commonly experienced by  women between the ages of 18-24.

Domestic violence is preventable. Part of domestic violence prevention includes talking about this issue and reducing the stigma associated with it as a community. While all of October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month, the National Network to End Domestic Violence is hosting a week of action from October 16-October 22.

Here are some ways that you can get involved during the week of action and throughout all of October. You can also search for events that may be happening in your community with local organizations.

  • Wear purple for #PurpleThursday on Thursday October 20
  • Speak Out: Talk with a friend, family member, or colleague about domestic violence to help eliminate stigma and show survivors that they are supported.
  • Follow the National Network to End Domestic Violence on social media (Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram and change

For anonymous, confidential help available 24/7, call the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 (SAFE) or 1-800-787-3224 (TTY) now.

Corporate Integrity Agreements

Throughout the summer I’ve dedicated several posts to the ways that medical and pharmaceutical publishing should be ethically conducted, according to established requirements and guidelines.

However, I’m sure it comes as no surprise that pharmaceutical companies have consistently failed to play by these rules. Headlines such as “GlaxoSmithKline to Plead Guilty and Pay $3 Billion to Resolve Fraud Allegations and Failure to Report Safety Data,” and “Bristol-Myers Squibb to Pay More Than $515 million to Resolve Illegal Drug Marketing and Pricing Allegations,” are proof that these companies are not always committed to high ethical standards of practice.

Although industry standards such as the ICMJE and GPP3 guidelines are almost universally accepted, they are not laws and are therefore not usually enforceable.

However, when pharmaceutical and biotech companies fall under Federal investigation, the Office of the Inspector General (OIG) can make them agree to abide by a Corporate Integrity Agreement (CIA) as part of their legal settlement.

These CIAs legally obligate companies to abide by many of the tenets of the previously mentioned guidelines and ensure ethical practice by imposing requirements such as:

  • hiring a compliance officer/appointing a compliance committee
  • developing written standards and policies
  • implementing a comprehensive employee training program
  • retaining an independent review organization (IRO) to conduct annual reviews
  • restricting employment of ineligible persons (people who have been flagged for unethical behavior)
  • providing an implementation report and annual reports to OIG on the status of compliance activities

If a company is non-compliant with their CIA, they risk having their product pulled from the list of products that can be reimbursed through Federal health care programs such as Medicare and Medicaid. This loss would be a crippling financial hit to most companies, making compliance with these agreements a high priority.
In this way, the industry can be kept in check and forced to behave in a more ethical manner.

Research Dissemination: Part 2

The most highly regarded place to publish medical research findings is in a peer-reviewed scholarly journal. However, journals are not all considered equal.


Most people have at least heard of the so-called “top-tier” journals including The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), the British Medical Journal, and the New England Journal of Medicine. There are also mid-tier journals which are still respectable, but less competitive, and then there are lower quality journals whose standards and peer review process are much less rigorous (or non-existent) and consequently are taken much less seriously by the medical community.  

The dream is usually to have an article published in a top-tier journal, however, this is not always the best choice depending on the content and goal of a paper. If a paper does not present novel and/or ground-breaking findings, it is probably not worth an author’s’ time to submit it to a top journal and then wait, only to be rejected. Also, if authors’ want to get the results of a study published quickly so that the data is publicly available (for instance to help support an application for FDA approval), it is probably better to go with a less prestigious journal that has a higher acceptance rate or a less rigorous review process.

In addition to journal prestige, there are many other factors that must also be considered when deciding where to submit a manuscript. For example, medical specialty, target audience, impact factor, primary language or region, length limits, and allowance of figures and other supplementary materials are all potential considerations.

Due to the complexity of the factors that weigh into this decision, many medical publications agencies offer assistance with target journal selection by researching and compiling this information for authors so that they can more easily make a decision based on the variables that are most important to them for a particular manuscript.

 
Getting the right information in front of the right audience in a timely manner is critically important in fields such as medicine and pharmaceuticals since that information could potentially affect the lives and well-being of countless individuals.

Research Dissemination: Part 1

After a clinical trial or other medical study has been conducted and the researchers have planned out the ways in which they want to structure the results for disseminationthey next need to actually make that information public in the form of one or more medical publications. These publications typically take the form of posters, presentations, and journal manuscripts.

These publications all require a brief written summary known as an abstract. An abstract includes an overview of each relevant section of a medical publication including the study’s objectives, methods, results, and a discussion of the main conclusions.

For conferences, abstracts are typically developed and submitted as a first step in the acceptance process. The conference committee will then use the submitted abstract to decide whether or not to include a poster or presentation about that study as part of the conference. Once an abstract has been accepted to the conference, the authors can then create a poster or slide deck to present.

Because researchers want to get the maximum bang for their buck when it comes to their study data, most research findings will be presented as a poster or an oral presentation at a medical conference first, then be expanded into a full manuscript for publication in an academic journal.
Manuscripts allow researchers to provide a more detailed description of a study’s results and implications and are also able to reach a wider audience. We’ll talk more about manuscripts in next week’s post so be sure to check back on Monday.

Publication Planning: You have the data, now what?

Research, in any field, tends to be time-consuming and expensive. This is especially true of large-scale medical research trials. Therefore physicians and pharmaceutical companies, just like researchers in other fields, want to make optimal use of their research activities by producing as many publications from the resulting data as possible.

There are limits to how far these boundaries can be pushed, however. For example, duplicate publications are generally not permissible. This “double-dipping” includes publishing or presenting an identical work in multiple journals or at multiple conferences, but it also bars researchers from reworking a published piece in a way that does not contribute any new knowledge or insights to the results that were originally published.

One study usually measures a large number of variables and can therefore still be broken down into countless publications without violating sanctions against duplicate publications. For a clinical trial of a particular drug, for example, publications could focus on different outcome measures, such as the mechanism of action, safety, efficacy, economic considerations, administration, adherence, etc. Different publications could also examine these variable in various subgroups, such as pregnant women, the elderly, patients with certain co-morbidities, etc.   

In order to balance the desire for publication volume with the need to be ethically responsible by only publishing works that have scientific value, it is essential that large organizations and companies engage in publication planning activities. By convening a group of stakeholders at a publication planning meeting, an organization or company can lay out all of their available study data and determine what can and should be published from it.

In addition, gap analyses can be conducted to determine the topics or types of information that are missing in the current body of literature which can then serve as basis for future research studies intended to produce that information.

In this way, the cycle of medical research and publishing is continually pushed forward to produce new and valuable knowledge, both for the research community and for healthcare providers.

Authorship of Medical Publications

Last week I briefly introduced the concept of professional medical writers. These individuals are hired to write or create medical publications (such as abstracts, journal articles, and conference posters or presentations) on behalf of, or in collaboration with the actual researchers. Medical writers are often used because researchers do not have the time, interest, or the writing expertise to create high quality, publishable work in a timely manner. However, the listed authors still need to be involved in the writing process, and have specific obligations to fulfil in order to qualify as an author.

The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) recommends that authorship be based on the following 4 criteria: http://www.icmje.org/icmje-recommendations.pdf

  1. Substantial contributions to the conception or design of the work; or the acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data for the work; AND
  2. Drafting the work or revising it critically for important intellectual content; AND
  3. Final approval of the version to be published; AND
  4. Agreement to be accountable for all aspects of the work in ensuring that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved.

Authorship is one of the major ways in which researchers get credit for the work that they do, which in turn often leads to professional and financial benefits. However, being designated as an author also carries a level of responsibility, as it serves as a public acknowledgement that an individual is willing and able to vouch for a publication and field any questions or critiques that may arise after publication of the work. Therefore, it is important that ethical authorship practices continue to be upheld, and that medical writers are used appropriately.

STI or STD: What Is The Difference?

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If your work involves talking to people about sexual health, you must be talking to them about STDs. Or STIs. Or both. Right?

As the great STD-STI terminology challenge continues, just about everyone has had to choose one term or the other. Well, everyone except for the people who use both interchangeably to mean the same thing. Or those folks who use each in distinct ways to mean different things.

Many well-informed experts make absolutely no distinction between STI and STD. Others feel the distinctions are real and important.

For those who make a distinction, most would say STD describes a condition with visible signs and describable symptoms—a drip, an itch, a bump, fatigue. STI encompasses the broader spectrum of conditions both with and without symptoms.

There was some idea that using STI would make it clear to everyone that sexually transmitted conditions often have no symptoms. It might also lessen the stigma people frequently feel about having these conditions, making them more amenable to testing and treatment.

In actual practice, I’m not at all sure that’s happened. We now have reports that many young people believe STD refers to illnesses that can’t be cured, and STI refers to illnesses that can be.

There are sound reasons for choosing either term, or both. Which is working for you right now? Why is it best for your purposes? We’d love to hear your thoughts.

Marcia Quackenbush, MS, MFT, MCHES, is Senior Editor at ETR. You can view this article in its entirety at http://www.etr.org/blog/my-take-std-sti/