Category: Health Communication

Dr Lisa on the Streets: An approach to improve health literacy

Health literacy has become a buzzword not only in the public health world but in general. As the technologies, treatments and advancements are improving the quality of medicine, the way that these new discoveries are communicated are not. One physician and public health professional has made it her mission to increase the awareness of the health literacy crisis here in the United States by taking it to who it affects the most, Americans. She has launched a “Dr. Lisa on the Streets” campaign to increase awareness and gather support to improve the way health information is communicated. In her TedX talk “Are you confused about health information? You’re not alone” she discusses the economic consequences of low health literacy and how as a nation we can attempt to improve this. She refers to the “grapevine” (casual conversations, internet etc.) as one of the most powerful educators and needing to capitalize on this as a means of sharing health information.

Here are few strategies mentioned in the video about improving health literacy:

  • Manage the grapevine, it’s like ivy if it isn’t maintained it will get out of control
    • Need grapevine to counteract misinformation through verification before spreading information
  • Doctors need to embrace technology
    • Change is inspired by the masses
  • Health literacy is up to you!
    • Avoid gaps in care
    • Find your provider
    • Be persistent

To learn more about this movement and health literacy watch the full TedX talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-x6DLqtaK2g

Health Orientations for New Patients

Orientations for new patients are one technique for setting the stage for positive patient experiences with a new clinic, especially for those who are unfamiliar with the healthcare system. These orientations have been shown to be successful in reducing stress for cancer patients, preparing patients for beginning psychotherapy, and reducing no-show appointments in a primary care setting, which improves clinic efficiency.

As the Patient Navigator at a Federally-Qualified Health Center (FQHC) from 2016 to 2017, I was tasked with creating this type of program for immigrant and refugee patients, whose cultural differences and unfamiliarity with the American healthcare system often serve as a barrier to successful clinic interactions. From speaking to clinic providers on various levels, as well as patients from refugee communities, I established the following priorities for the orientation curriculum:

  1. Prescription refill process
  2. Calls to our clinic – what to expect, how to request an interpreter, how to speak to a nurse
  3. Difference between preventative and acute care, and emergencies, and benefits of seeing your provider at least once a year
  4. How to make and cancel appointments, and why no-shows reduce our efficiency
  5. Different occupations that clinic staff hold, and how staff can connect patients to other resources they may need
  6. General information about the American healthcare system that may be confusing, such as insurance coverage and social services application processes
  7. Patient rights and responsibilities
  8. Interactions with providers – letting patients know that they can and should ask questions when confused, or when misunderstood by an interpreter or provider

I quickly found that creating a curriculum like this presents several challenges. For example, “refugees and immigrants” is a broad group of people, representing those from wildly different education levels and familiarity with Western healthcare systems. Many times, it was impossible to know patients’ backgrounds before meeting with them to discuss our clinic. I had to be careful to be informational without seeming patronizing, while basing communication strategy on the perceived level of understanding of the patient, which can also be influenced by cultural norms.

Patient orientations have a great potential to reduce patient stress, improve understanding of clinic operations, and give the power back to the patient when it comes to their own health. However, cultural differences must be given weight when developing this type of program. Using community leaders or liaisons for curriculum development and delivery may be a way to bridge that gap.

Sources:

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/(SICI)1099-1611(199805/06)7:3%3C207::AID-PON304%3E3.0.CO;2-T

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/1097-4679(198311)39:6%3C872::AID-JCLP2270390610%3E3.0.CO;2-X

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1046/j.1525-1497.2000.00201.x

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277953610003199

Using Oral History in Public Health

Public health prides itself on being interdisciplinary – but there’s always more to learn. I recently discovered a field of study whose department at UNC was looking to collaborate with public health students. This discipline is called oral history, and the Southern Oral History Program at UNC is a pioneer in its field.

Oral history works to preserve narratives by interviewing, recording, and archiving life stories. The narrator is often from a part of society whose voices have been silenced, and wants to contribute his or her life story to historical archives. For this reason, unlike with traditional qualitative interviews in public health, the narrator’s identifying information is often attached to his or her story. When oral historians use life stories in their research, the narrators play an important role in ensuring that their stories are portrayed accurately. They also receive a copy of their interview, preserved in a written format, for themselves and future generations.

Oral history would be especially useful in conducting public health needs assessments, seeking community expertise for solving a local health problem, finding more robust quotes for supporting policy movements, or discovering the experiences of living through a particular outbreak or natural disaster. Public health research already uses qualitative interviewing techniques, but could greatly benefit from more collaboration with oral historians. We traditionally go into interviews with pre-established questions about specific health topics. We may get some background of the participant’s life, but hearing this as a narrative rather than a response could help us build a deeper understanding of the person sitting across from us.

Sources:

http://www.oralhistory.org/

www.sohp.org

App Grindr under scrutiny over privacy concerns

In an article published yesterday by BuzzFeed News, it was released that Gay Dating App Grindr has been sharing its users’ HIV status with two outside companies, a move which many consider dangerous to the queer community that the app claims to serve.

The sites, Apptimize and Localytics, work with Grindr to optimize the app and user experience. While it has been noted that these companies do not share information with third parties, there are still concerns with the sharing of sensitive information of a historically vulnerable population. This could raise flags for users sharing their HIV status on the app, which could negatively impact public health interventions that work to reduce HIV transmission and stigma.

Grindr recently announced that they would remind users to get tested for HIV every three to six months, offering a cue to action for users to be more aware of their HIV status. Knowing ones status is a crucial component for reducing the number of new HIV infections, such as by offering the opportunity to those who are living with HIV to be connected to care and achieve viral suppression.

 

Sources:

BuzzFeed News: Grindr Is Sharing The HIV Status Of Its Users With Other Companies –https://www.buzzfeed.com/azeenghorayshi/grindr-hiv-status-privacy?bfsplash&utm_term=.eu9v16ZaQ#.akvOQgNJj

Stethoscopes and Smartphones? How Doctors are Using mHealth Apps for Patient Care

By Elizabeth Adams, MA

There was a time when doctors circulated the hallways of hospitals with nothing but a beeper pinned to the waistline of their scrubs.

But today, you might notice your doctor enter the exam room clutching a more advanced communication device – a Smartphone or tablet. A 2014 survey reported that 85% of medical faculty, 90% of medical residents, and 85% of medical students used a Smartphone in a clinical setting1. Modern doctors are increasingly replacing laptops or desktops with Smartphones and tablets2.

Doctors are constantly on their feet, moving throughout hospitals, emergency rooms, or clinics.  They use these devices for variety of job-related tasks, including remote patient monitoring, electronic health record access, e-prescribing, drug reference calculations, reading medical news, and decision-making support3. Now there is a marketplace for health professionals to locate apps designed specifically for clinical practice. In 2011, the iPhone App Store introduced the “Apps for Health Care Professionals” section, which has expanded to include more than 80 app options4.

Here are a few ways doctors are using apps to improve patient care:

 Retrieving Information. Doctors increasingly rely on mhealth to inform complex clinical assessments and decisions. One survey indicated that two-thirds of doctors use medication-interaction assistance apps to aid in the prescription decision-making process5. In addition, medical residents rely on mobile phones in clinical consultation to look up drug information, perform clinical calculations, take notes, or look up clinical guidelines4. Instantaneous access to information can help doctors and trainees make more accurate decisions regarding treatment.

 Communicating with Patients. Electronic health record software, such as Epic (link to: https://www.inova.org/for-physicians/epiccare-apps) – the program used by UNC HealthCare – incorporate apps Haiku and Canto, which facilitate direct correspondence between patients and health care teams. Other third-party apps, such as OhMD (link to: https://www.ohmd.com), TigerText (link to: https://www.tigertext.com/), and Hale (link to: http://hale.co/), are compatible with electronic health record programs and connect patients to doctors through text messaging platforms.

Continuing Education. Mobile continuing education curricula promises to supply doctors and trainees with current medical information and impart recent standards of practice without the time-consuming requirement of sitting at a desktop or in a classroom. In addition, top-tier medical journals, including the New England Journal of Medicine’s This Week app (link to: http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMe1201837) and the American Medical Association’s CPT QuickRef app (link to: https://www.ama-assn.org/practice-management/applying-cpt-codes), deliver scientific articles and guidelines.

 More research is necessary to understand the relationship between mhealth app adoption and improved clinical care outcomes. Smartphones could be considered impediments to patient care, so they must be used with some discretion. But next time your doctor walks in with a tablet or glances at a Smartphone, remember that he or she might be using an app to make better decisions for your health.

References

  1. Ventola, C. Lee. “Mobile Devices and Apps for Health Care Professionals: Uses and Benefits.” Pharmacy and Therapeutics5 (2014): 356–364.
  2. Murfin, M. Know your apps: an evidence-based approach to evaluation of mobile clinical applications. Journal of Physician Assist Education. 2013; 24(3):38-40.
  3. Kaufman, Michele B,PharmD., R.Ph. “Mobile Health Increases as Physicians Seek New Ways to Manage Patients.”Formulary, vol. 47, no. 4, 2012, pp. 161-162, ProQuest, http://libproxy.lib.unc.edu/login?url=https://search-proquest-com.libproxy.lib.unc.edu/docview/1145903653?accountid=14244.
  4. Dolan, B. Apple’s Top 80 Apps for Doctors, Nurses, and Patients. [Online] November 27, 2012. http://www.mobihealthnews.com/19206/apples-top-80-apps-for-doctors-nurses-patients/
  5. Boruff, J. T. M., & Storie, D. M. M. A. Mobile devices in medicine: a survey of how medical students, residents, and faculty use smartphones and other mobile devices to find information. Journal of the Medical Library Association, (2014): 102(1), 22-30.

What’s going on with the HPV vaccine?

HPV is the most common STI, and 9 of every 10 people will have an infection at some point in their lives (1).  This virus can cause cancers in the cervix, penis, mouth, and oropharynx (2), and it also causes genital warts (3).  Even though a vaccine exists against HPV, less than half of teens are up to date on all of their doses of these shots (2).

Part of the reason behind these low vaccination rates are due to parents concerns regarding vaccine safety and fear that vaccination will encourage sexual activity (4).  Though all vaccines, including this one, have potential side effects, the HPV vaccine is considered safe (4). Additionally, studies have shown that the HPV vaccine does not make teens more likely to start having sex (4).

The way providers approach talking about the HPV has also influenced vaccine rates, and strong provider endorsement seems to improve vaccinations (5).  On Monday, March 19, Chris Noronha spoke with the Interdisciplinary Health Communications Class about the work he is doing with Noel Brewer on provider communication regarding the HPV vaccine.  They have found that when providers mention the HPV vaccine in the same list as other vaccines that are due at age 11, vaccination rates increase.

If you’re interested in the HPV vaccine, it may not be too late.  You can receive the series through age 26 (1).  Contact your provider if you’re interested.

 

Works Cited
  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine Safety. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [Online] January 30, 2018. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccinesafety/vaccines/hpv-vaccine.html.
  2. Aubrey, Allison. This Vaccine Can Prevent Cancer, But Many Teenagers Still Don’t Get It. National Public Radio. [Online] February 19, 2018. https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/02/19/586494027/this-vaccine-can-prevent-cancer-but-many-teenagers-still-dont-get-it.
  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. What is HPV. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [Online] December 20, 2016. https://www.cdc.gov/hpv/parents/whatishpv.html.
  4. —. Talking to Parents About HPV vaccine. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [Online] December 2016. https://www.cdc.gov/hpv/hcp/for-hcp-tipsheet-hpv.pdf.
  5. Narula, Tara. HPV vaccine: Why aren’t children getting it? CBS News. [Online] July 23, 2017. https://www.cbsnews.com/news/hpv-vaccination-cancer-prevention-dr-tara-narula/.

 

 

“The Angelina Effect”

In this day of age celebrities dominate our world. They hold elected office, they are activists, they are social media entrepreneurs, they are everywhere. Whether we like to believe it or not they have influence over our behaviors and how we make decisions. I’m guilty that most of the accounts I follow on Instagram are former Bachelor contestants and catch myself wanting to mimic their fashion and fitness routines. In fact, there has been research that has examined this phenomenon. Back in 2013, esteemed actress Angelina Jolie announced that she carries the a genetic mutation that greatly increases your risk of breast and ovarian cancer (BRCA1). In her New York Times opt ed piece, Jolie reveals that she lost her mom, aunt and grandmother to cancer and that influence her decision to undergo preventive surgery to remove both of her breasts (mastectomy) and ovaries. After this announcement, several researchers explored what came to be known as “The Angelina Effect” and how her decision influenced other women’s decisions about their own health. In a study published in Health Services Research journal, hospital data from both New York and the UK revealed that three months after Jolie’s announcement there was a significant increase in preventive mastectomies prior to the announcement. This trend has been seen with other celebrities after announcements of diagnoses and provides incentives for both public figures and healthcare providers to use these instances as teachable moments and bring awareness to employ preventive healthcare.

To learn more about the BRCA1 gene visit the following site: https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/genetics/brca-fact-sheet#q1

 

 

 

Africa Vs. Big Tobacco

Lowering tobacco use has been one of the great successes of public health in the past 50 years, and continues to be a focus of research and intervention. This was achieved through policy and health communication. This journey has shown us that it is possible to change the culture and narrative around behavior, despite steady corporate influence. While tobacco is still a significant public health hurdle in the U.S., there is confidence in the direction we’re headed given what we’ve accomplished.

Unfortunately, tobacco companies are infiltrating other countries with less developed infrastructure for tackling this issue. Currently, low and middle income countries represent 80% of the world’s smokers, as well as smoking-related deaths. Africa in particular is falling victim to extremely powerful tobacco marketing campaigns – smoking prevalence in Lesotho rose from 15% to 52% just between 2004 and 2015, and the industry even manipulated public health policy in Nigeria. Big tobacco is no stranger to targeting advertising strategies to vulnerable groups.

In order to reverse this, we need to support strategies that African countries have already begun to administer. Ghana and Madagascar have implemented tobacco advertising bans; several nations have introduced graphic labels on cigarette packs; South Africa has increased tax on tobacco products; and Kenya has implemented a system for tracking and tracing illicit tobacco product sales.

Already having the knowledge of the danger of tobacco will hopefully help other countries prevent the industry’s hold from strengthening. We must support their efforts before it’s too late.

Sources:

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-03-big-tobacco-world-vulnerable-profits.html

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4105326/

https://tobacco.ucsf.edu/how-tobacco-industry-manipulated-public-health-policy-nigeria

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-03-big-tobacco-world-vulnerable-profits.html

https://www.thecommunityguide.org/findings/tobacco-use-and-secondhand-smoke-exposure-mass-reach-health-communication-interventions

https://betobaccofree.hhs.gov/

https://www.rwjf.org/maketobaccohistory

 

“If your mother says she loves you, check it out”, Stephanie Brown’s guide to identifying false new stories

On Monday, our class had the pleasure of hearing UNC’s own Stephanie Brown discuss her most recent article “New Stories Credible or Clickable: Schema of Fake News to Corrections” featured in Communication: Journalism Education Today. Stephanie Brown is the director of the Parks Library at UNC’s School of Media and Journalism and is expert in news literacy and how to detect false news. Her presentation focused on the best ways to detect if an article is considered credible or in today’s newly coined phrase “fake news”. She began her presentation with an exercise “Would you share” to get our class thinking about the creditability of articles and if we would feel comfortable sharing them on our own social media platforms. This lively discussion brought up some of the consequences of sharing inaccurate news information and how we go addressing others who share these types of stories. Then she moved on how ways to identify articles that are “fake news” and unreliable sources through a comprehensive checklist. She went through the checklist with a few example articles that captive our class’s attention. The checklist was originally developed by the News Literacy Project and includes about seven items. A few examples of the items on the checklist include looking out for articles that are overly emotional, that use excessive punctuation, make a claim about a secret that the media is hiding from you and the types of sources the article cites. One interesting item on the checklist that she harped on was looking at the advertisements and sponsored content on the sides of the article. That can be a telling item if the advertisement is featuring “Lose 5 lbs in a week with this new pill” vs. “Visit Florida” in determining the credibility of the content.

Here is the full News Literacy project checklist: http://www.thenewsliteracyproject.org/sites/default/files/DontGetFooled_FINAL_020518.pdf

 

Medicaid Expansion and the Opioid Epidemic in the U.S.

As the United States continues to be embattled in an ongoing opioid overdose epidemic, new research is showing the benefits that Medicaid expansion has had under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). According to a recent study out of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, the rate in which patients who were hospitalized due to opioid-related health issues, who were uninsured dropped in states that expanded Medicaid, from 13.4% in 2013 to 2.9% the following year. The same study also showed that Medicaid expansion had not contributed to the ongoing opioid crisis, showing that opioid-related hospitalizations were higher in states that expanded Medicaid three years before expansion occurred, and that the rates had been steady in expansion and non-expansion states. As we can see, Medicaid expansion has had a profound impact in reducing the rate of uninsured, and in the case of the ongoing Opioid epidemic, Medicaid plays a key and vital role in working to help curb the epidemic. For more information on this study from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, please check out the link below.

Sources:

Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, Medicaid Expansion Dramatically Increased Covered for People with Opioid-Use Disorders, Latest Data Shows – https://www.cbpp.org/research/health/medicaid-expansion-dramatically-increased-coverage-for-people-with-opioid-use