Category: Disease

Recent Data on Obesity Prevalence in the U.S.

The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) recently released a data brief on recent estimates for obesity prevalence in the United States. These estimates are from the most recent National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for 2015-2016. Some key survey findings showed that in 2015-2016, obesity prevalence was 39.8% among adults and 18.5% among youth in the U.S. Additionally, obesity prevalence was found to be 13.9% for children aged 2-5 years, 18.4% for children aged 6-11 years, and 20.6% for children aged 12-19 years.

While there was not a significant change in obesity prevalence among U.S. adults and youth between 2013-2014 and 2015-2016, obesity continues to remain an important public health concern.

Obesity prevalence rates in the U.S. do not currently meet national weight status objectives set forth in Healthy People 2020, a 10-year national agenda for improving public health in the U.S. These objectives are to reduce the proportion of U.S. adults that are obese to 30.5%, as well as reduce the proportion of U.S. children aged 2-5 years, 6-11 years, and 12-19 years that are obese to 9.4%, 15.7%, and 16.1%, respectively, by the year 2020.

Obesity can lead to serious health effects, such as: high blood pressure, heart disease, and even type 2 diabetes. However, maintaining a healthy weight through eating right and staying physically active can prevent these negative health outcomes.

References

Prevalence of Obesity among Adults and Youth: United States, 2015-2016. (2017, October). Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db288.pdf

Nutrition and Weight Status. (2017, October 13). Retrieved from https://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topics-objectives/topic/nutrition-and-weight-status/objectives

Eat Right. (N.d.). Retrieved from https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/educational/lose_wt/eat/index.htm

Be Physically Active. (N.d.) Retrieved from https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/educational/lose_wt/physical.htm

Football and Concussions: Where do we go from here?

October may be my favorite month of the year: sweater weather, changing leaves, and most importantly college football is at its peak. I am a University of Michigan Wolverine fan and every Saturday I look forward to watching the game. Even though I live and breath for college football, as a public health student I still have many concerns about the health implications of this game on players.

CTE (chronic traumatic encephalopathy) is a degenerative brain disease caused by multiple blows/hits to the head. This disease is seen in many former football players; however, the catch is that it is only diagnosable after a person has died through an autopsy. Symptoms of this disease include impulsive behavior, depression, memory loss, substance abuse, emotional instability and suicidal thoughts or behaviors.

CTE has affected many former NFL players such as Mike Webster, Ken Stabler, Kevin Turner, Bubba Smith and Dave Duerson. A study published in JAMA this past July found that out of the 202 deceased football players 177 had CTE (87%) while of the 111 former NFL players 110 of them had CTE (99%). The high prevalence of this disease is a call for action on better treatment and care for these players by these franchises especially since these franchises are not running low on cash.

To learn more about CTE check out the Concussion Legacy Foundation’s website: https://concussionfoundation.org/CTE-resources/what-is-CTE

Flu Shot Season

When it comes to the flu shot, I trust in the CDC for their advice and present it as follows. Some vaccines contain inactive virus parts to three types of influenza while others have four. The predicted and included flu strains are educated guesses, so a quadrivalent vaccine might cover more bases. Search for flu shot locations around you and find out which they offer.

If an individual has never gotten the flu or the flu shot, they may not think they need to be vaccinated. This experienced phenomenon is often due to herd immunity, where the surrounding people in a population act as insulation against the flu because they were vaccinated and so not spreading it. Another common myth is that the flu shot will give you the flu though this is not the case. The body takes up to a few weeks after being exposed to the inactivated virus to develop antibodies, and while your immune system is working on this you may not feel at your best for a day or so. If I experience this, I remind myself how much worse the full-fledged flu virus feels. The flu shot may even decrease your risk by half.

October is the time to get it— read up on the flu shot and make a choice that best benefits your health and the health of those around you!

Emerging Emojis–the fight for a seat at the table

Do you sometimes feel like an emoji is the only way to perfectly embody the message, or the face, you are trying to convey?

It’s no secret that emojis are changing the way we communicate. They don’t just appear on our phones, either. Popularized emojis are iconic, appearing on clothing, in advertisements, and other outlets. They allow for a creation of meaning and personalization, as a readily accessible tool with which to join a dialogue.

Marla Shaivitz, a communication specialist at Johns Hopkins University’s Bloomberg School of Public Health, and Jeff Chertack, a malaria expert with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, are appealing to the Unicode Consortium–an organizing body that approves characters an emojis for standardized usage–to consider adding a female mosquito to the list of emojis that will be added to smartphones next year. Apparently, the mosquito is among a list of 67 finalists that will be further considered.

Anticipated uses of the emoji include pairing the image with other symbols–a rain cloud, for instance, to encourage people to stay dry indoors and to encourage insecticide application–or to indicate that eradication efforts are under progress. As mosquitoes are key in infectious disease transmission (for viruses including dengue, Zika, malaria, and yellow fever), a recognizable symbol might encourage more dialogue about preventative behaviors or information-seeking behaviors.

Shaivitz and Chertack make their case by estimating seven times more usage of the mosquito emoji than of the beetle emoji on Twitter. In fact, they claim there is a pretty high demand for it.

When you think about the truly random emojis that do exist, it would seem far-fetched not to include one that has the potential to actually make a  positive change. Time will tell if Unicode bites.

Sources:

http://www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-moquito-emoji-health-20170922-story.html

hhtps://ccp.jhu.edu/2017/09/18/creating-buzz-proposing-mosquito-emoji-public-health/

 

Farm Health and Safety Awareness

September 17-23 marks National Farm Health and Safety Week 2017. As someone who grew up on a Dairy and Crop Farm, I am all too familiar with the dangers that come along with a life in agriculture. From close calls, to the injuries of family members, to the tragic passing and near death experiences of neighbors and others in the community, the risk of injury and death was always in the back of my mind. My parents still operate our family farm together, juggling the responsibilities of keeping the farm going, raising grandchildren, and navigating health issues that someone who has grandchildren often begin to deal with (sorry mom and dad!).

The National Education Center for Agricultural Safety uses each day this week to highlight a different issue that faces those who work in the agricultural industry, and today marks farmer health. Where I’m from in the Thumb of Michigan, many of the local farms are operated by an aging population, who along with the risks involved with a farming lifestyle, are also coping with diseases associated with aging, such as arthritis and cancer. I encourage you to take the time to learn more about the Health of Farmers, and to appreciate the unique challenges that accompany the large scale agricultural work, and the impact that farming has on a national and global scale. More information is sourced below!

 

Sources –

National Education Center for Agricultural Safety National Farm Health and Safety Week 2017 – http://www.necasag.org/nationalfarmsafetyandhealthweek/

Lady Gaga Reveals Battle with Fibromyalgia

This past week, music sensation Lady Gaga revealed on her Twitter account that she has been battling fibromyalgia, and was recently taken to the hospital for severe pain, leading her to cancel one of her performances. While it may not have been easy to do, Lady Gaga’s decision to open up about her condition sheds an important light on the debilitating condition that is fibromyalgia.

According to the Centers for Disease Control, fibromyalgia affects about 4 million US adults. It is a chronic condition characterized by widespread pain and can include symptoms of fatigue, depression, and headaches that can negatively affect quality of life. While it is unclear what causes fibromyalgia,  some possible risk factors include age, stressful or traumatic experiences, family history, and sex. According to the Centers for Disease Control, women are twice as likely to have fibromyalgia as men.

Treatment for fibromyalgia often involves a team of different health professionals, and can be effectively managed with a combination of medication, exercise, and stress management techniques.

Check out the following resources for more information about fibromyalgia and how you can get involved in raising awareness of this condition:

The National Fibromyalgia Association

The American Fibromyalgia Syndrome Association, Inc.

Fibromyalgia | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Questions and Answers about Fibromyalgia | National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases  

Note: Lady Gaga has been working on a documentary entitled “Lady Gaga: Five Foot Two,” in which she discusses her battle with fibromyalgia. This film will be available on Netflix on September 22.  

References:

Fibromyalgia. (2017, September 6). Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/arthritis/basics/fibromyalgia.htm

Park, Andrea. (2017, September 13). Lady Gaga opens up about having fibromyalgia. https://www.cbsnews.com/news/lady-gaga-opens-up-on-fibromyalgia-on-twitter/

Questions and Answers about Fibromyalgia. (2014, July). Retrieved from https://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Fibromyalgia/default.asp#c

Are You Healthy?

To understand whether or not your healthy, you have to first understand what it means to be healthy. It seems straightforward, but in the modern age, this is a complex question.

We might at first be inclined to think that being healthy means that you don’t have any illness or injury. But is this always true? What if you have an illness that is managed by medication? What if a person has a disability but the disability doesn’t disrupt their daily life? What if you’ve been diagnosed with pre-hypertension but have no symptoms?

Joseph Dumit, Director of Science and Technology Studies and Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Davis, discusses various changes to our view of health and illness since the rise of the randomized control trial in his book Drugs for Life: How Pharmaceutical Companies Define Our Health (Duke University Press, 2012). He argues “that being at risk for illness is often treated as if one had a disease requiring lifelong treatments, drugs for life” (6).

Dumit discusses a few prediseases in depth, looking at pre-hypertensive, pre-diabetes, and borderline high cholesterol. “Literally, a disease-sounding syndrome is produced by correlating risk factors and naming it in such a way that it becomes common sense to think about treating ‘it’ as a disease in and of itself” (165). Hence, health becomes a matter of risk where we are all bodies constantly at risk of disease. If you have pre-diabetes, are you healthy? How do we understand our health in a risk economy of health?

This intersects interestingly with Donald A. Barr’s claim, in his book Health Disparities in the United States: Social Class, Race, Ethnicity, & Health, that despite investing so much of our economy in health, US health indexes rank rather low; “[p]erhaps, our basic assumption–that more health care will lead, necessarily, to better health–is flawed.”

The Aftermath of a Hurricane– public health concerns after a storm

Hurricane Harvey hit Texas hard last week. CNN says it was the strongest hurricane since Charlie hit the Southeast in 2004 (they have also shared some striking images of the damages and flooding if you want to click that link). New sources today have the current casualty total at least 70. As entire communities of people regather and begin to rebuild their lives, there are concerns to consider beyond immediate damage. Times of chaos, grief, and mass movement are ripe for poor health conditions. What health problems do hurricanes leave behind?

NPR interviewed Dr. Ruth Berggren, an infectious disease specialist who has had a lot of experience treating patients post-natural disasters. After all, she was a physician in New Orleans when Hurricane Katrina hit in 2005, and has been dealing with the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey this week. She talks about violence, mental health, and infectious diseases issues as being of particular concern in the immediate aftermath of such a storm.

According to the New York Post, Harvey sunk the crest of the Earth by about 0.75 inches! Combine that heavy water burden with people living in close proximity in emergency shelters in less than ideal hygienic conditions, and you can see why the IDSA (Infectious Diseases Society of America) is concerned with the spread of viruses. In particular, they are worried about infections that spread quickly like norovirus, and those that might affect unvaccinated populations who now have more exposure to pathogens. This is especially concerning as mosquitoes, temporarily scared off by the storm, come back to stagnant water, possibly carrying diseases with them. Access to medications to treat chronic illnesses is also expected to be more difficult. For some populations, like those living with HIV, it’s really important not to disrupt treatment. Finally going home to mold and disarray increases the likelihood of asthma and respiratory tract illnesses.

The Carribean Islands, currently facing similar conditions as Hurricane Irma unfolds, are witnessing similar public health crises.

As we hope for a quick and wholesome recovery to those affected by these storms, consider donating if you can—this NYT article links to some organizations, both local and national, that are gathering funds.

PrEP for HIV Prevention? Here’s what you need to know

Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis, or PrEP, has changed the way in which we talk about HIV Prevention. After being approved for preventive use by the FDA in 2012, there has been a sharp increase in PrEP prescriptions in the U.S. over the past several years. Currently, the only prescription available for PrEP is Truvada, which also serves as a treatment drug for those who are HIV positive.

Truvada is a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, or an NRTI. When exposed to HIV, a NRTI works by masking itself as a building block of the virus’s genetic structure. While our own cells are able to recognize and correct for this coding mistake, HIV cannot, and as a result is unable to replicate and mount a widespread infection.

A quick distinction: Truvada as a drug is a form of PrEP, PrEP is a general class of preventive measures. Birth control can be thought of as a form of PrEP, preventing a pregnancy before it occurs. Even sunscreen is a form for PrEP. You apply lotion to prevent sunburn before it occurs.

But PrEP only works if you take it. According to recent findings from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the majority of uptake of PrEP in the United States has been among middle-aged, white, gay men. But the HIV epidemic has shifted, with the CDC noting continuous inequalities in the southern states and among young African Americans.

More concentrated efforts need to happen to ensure that those who can benefit from PrEP are able to access and receive it. Gilead, the company that produces Truvada, has a copay card available, where they pay up to $3600 a year in copays for those living under 500% of the national poverty level. For more information on PrEP, UNC campus health also serves as a great resource on campus, and students can get more information by making a free appointment with Student Wellness by emailing LetsTalkAboutIt@unc.edu or by calling (919) 962-WELL(9355).

For additional Resources on what to know about PrEP, and how to have a conversation with your provider, please see the resources below for information from the CDC. For those looking for a PrEP friendly provider, here is a list of providers in the State of North Carolina who actively prescribe PrEP.

Sources –

Gilead Copay Card: https://www.gileadadvancingaccess.com/copay-coupon-card

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention PrEP Resources: https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/risk/prep/index.html

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention PrEP Information: https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/basics/prep.html

List of PrEP Providers: https://www.med.unc.edu/ncaidstraining/files/PrEPProvidersforDownload.pdf/view

Practicing Good Sleep Hygiene

Like diet and exercise, sleep is an important part of living a healthy life. Sleep supports healthy brain function, healthy growth and development, and our immune function. For adults, the National Sleep Foundation recommends 7 to 9 hours of sleep per night. But what happens if we don’t get enough shut-eye? This can affect our productivity, our ability to manage our emotions, and even our ability to fight off infections. In addition, a lack of sleep can increase our risk for obesity, heart disease, stroke, and diabetes.

An important part of getting enough and better sleep is practicing good sleep habits or “sleep hygiene.” Here are some ways that you can practice good sleep hygiene:

Sleep more consistently. Try to go to bed at the same time every night and wake up at the same time every morning by setting your alarm. This will help to reinforce your body’s sleep/wake cycle.

Create an optimal sleep environment. It may be helpful to keep any work-related items/electronics in a room other than the bedroom. This will allow you to better associate the bedroom with sleep. Also, use a comfortable mattress and pillows, and try to reduce any light and noise that can affect your sleep. Blackout curtains, eye masks, and/or ear plugs can help with this. Finally, keep your bedroom at a cool temperature (60-75 degrees Fahrenheit) to facilitate sound sleep.

Establish a bedtime ritual. Listening to relaxing music, stretching, or reading before bed can be helpful to prepare you for sound sleep. Avoid activities that are very stimulating such as strenuous exercise or using a computer.

Put away technology. Using electronic devices such as your cell phone and computer before bed can make falling asleep more difficult. This is because the blue light that emanates from your phone and computer screens stimulates your brain, which can affect your sleep/wake cycle. Avoid using these devices 30 minutes before bed.

Avoid cigarettes, alcohol, caffeine, and heavy meals before bed. Caffeine, alcohol, and cigarettes can act as stimulants that can keep you awake. Avoid these substances 4-6 hours before bedtime. Additionally, avoid heavy foods before bed as these may cause indigestion, disrupting your ability to fall asleep.

If you must, nap during the day. Taking naps later in the day may disrupt your drive to sleep at night.

Happy Sleeping!

Helpful Resources: 

National Sleep Foundation

American Academy of Sleep Medicine

American Sleep Association

National Healthy Sleep Awareness Project (from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine)

References: 

Circadian Rhythm and Your Body Clock. (N.d.). Retrieved from  https://sleep.org/articles/circadian-rhythm-body-clock/

Healthy Sleep Tips. (2017). Retrieved from https://sleepfoundation.org/sleep-tools-tips/healthy-sleep-tips/page/0/1

National Sleep Foundation. (2015, February 2). National Sleep Foundation Recommends New Sleep Times. Retrieved from https://sleepfoundation.org/press-release/national-sleep-foundation-recommends-new-sleep-times

The High-Tech World of Sleep. (N.d.). Retrieved from https://sleep.org/articles/how-technology-changing-the-way-we-sleep/

Twelve Simple Tips to Improve Your Sleep. (2007, December 18). Retrieved from http://healthysleep.med.harvard.edu/healthy/getting/overcoming/tips

Peters, B. (2016, March 1). What Sleep Rituals Should Be Part of Your Bedtime Routine?  Retrieved from https://www.verywell.com/bedtime-routines-and-sleep-rituals-for-restful-sleep-3014947

Why Is Sleep Important? (2017, June 7). Retrieved from https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/sdd/why