Author: Matt Johnson

Current Climate of HIV Disparity in NC: Part 2

Impact of Disparity

Research has shown that the prevalence of HIV diagnoses and the rates of new HIV infections are highest in the southern US, including North Carolina.7 In the state of North Carolina:

  • Male-to-male sexual contact represents the mode of transmission for almost 70% of men living with HIV8
  • Almost 6% of transmissions for men living with HIV were the result of dual exposure through injection drug use and male-to-male sexual contact8
  • Almost three-fourths of total HIV transmission in the state are the result of male-to male sexual contact8
  • Among new diagnoses, these numbers only seem to be increasing, closer to 84%8
  • Black men in the state of North Carolina are also 6 times more likely to be living with HIV than white males8
  • The Durham-Chapel Hill, Winston-Salem, Greensboro-High Points metropolitan areas were also identified within the top 25 metropolitan areas for prevalence of HIV diagnoses and rates of new infections7

Causes of Disparity

Pre-exposure prophylaxis offers many opportunities to prevent the spread of HIV; however, stigma surrounded the drug itself may be preventing many gay and bisexual men from seeking out the drug and many medical providers from prescribing the drug to their gay and bisexual patients. This could partially be a result of general stigma about asking patients sexual health questions or questions about sexuality. Simply prescribing PrEP to all gay and bisexual men would result in overuse. Hence, discussions about sexual risk behaviors is important for assessing an individual’s need for the drug. However, medical provider stigma might represent a larger barrier to accessing PrEP, especially for black men who have sex with men. Further, the population of medical providers has been less of a focus for current public health interventions to increase the use of PrEP.

 

References

  1. Duran, D. Truvada Whores? Huffinton Post. 2012. https://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-duran/truvada-whores_b_2113588.html
  2. Addison, V. Larry Kramer, Truvada Whores and the Angry Divide Between Two Generations. HIVEqual. n.d. http://www.hivequal.org/homepage/larry-kramer-truvada-whores-and-the-angry-divide-between-two-generations
  3. Logo. Revisiting “Truvada Whore” Three Years Later. NewNowNext. 2016. http://www.newnownext.com/revisiting-truvada-whore-three-years-later/02/2016/
  4. Emory University Rollins School of Public Health. North Carolina. AIDSVu. n.d. https://aidsvu.org/state/north-carolina/
  5. Calabrese SK, Underhill K. How Stigma Surrounding the Use of HIV Preexposure Prophylaxis Undermines Prevention and Pleasure: A Call to Destigmatize “Truvada Whores”. American journal of public health. 2015;105(10):1960-1964.
  6. Calabrese SK, Earnshaw VA, Underhill K, Hansen NB, Dovidio JF. The Impact of Patient Race on Clinical Decisions Related to Prescribing HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP): Assumptions About Sexual Risk Compensation and Implications for Access. AIDS and behavior. 2014;18(2):226-240.
  7. Rosenberg ES, Grey JA, Sanchez TH, Sullivan PS. Rates of Prevalent HIV Infection, Prevalent Diagnoses, and New Diagnoses Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in US States, Metropolitan Statistical Areas, and Counties, 2012-2013. JMIR Public Health Surveill. 2016;2(1):e22.
  8. Britz JJ. To Know or not to Know: A Moral Reflection on Information Poverty. Journal of Information Science. 2004;30(3):192-204.

Current Climate of HIV Disparity in NC: Part 1

For many people, the term AIDS is no longer representative of the state of HIV; with current treatment options, no individual’s manifestation of HIV should reach the level of AIDS. However, more work needs to be done to prevent the spread of HIV, specifically with a goal of protecting men in the gay community. In the US, men who have sex with men continue to carry the burden of prevalence of individuals living with HIV and rates of new diagnoses. This issue is exacerbated in the South and among black men who have sex with men. Pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV (PrEP) represents an opportunity to drastically reduce the number of new HIV diagnoses; however, individuals must be able to gain access to this preventative treatment.

Evidence of Disparity

On November 12, 2012, more than five years ago, David Duran wrote an article for the Huffington Post, titled “Truvada Whores?” Duran argued that pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV (PrEP) allows gay men (and other men who have sex with men) to engage in unsafe sex while taking a pill, rather than encouraging them to partake in safer-sex practices, by which I assume he means the use of a barrier method like a condom.1 In the past five years, little has changed in the way that people think about stigma and PrEP. Even within gay publications and HIV-centered advocacy groups, people continue to write about the “Truvada Whore.”2,3 The use of this term is strongly connected to stigma related to the use of PrEP, which is pervasive even within the medical community4,5 Stigma is exasperated when coupled with the implicit racial bias of providers that causes them to assume that black men who have sex with men engage in riskier sex6 As a result, there is stigma from within the gay community that assumes men who take PrEP are riskier or more likely to have HIV, from outside of the gay community that assumes they’re sluts or whores, and also specifically from the medical community, which assumes that prescribing PrEP will increase risk behaviors, leading to more HIV infections.

 

References

Works Cited

  1. Duran, D. Truvada Whores? Huffinton Post. 2012. https://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-duran/truvada-whores_b_2113588.html
  2. Addison, V. Larry Kramer, Truvada Whores and the Angry Divide Between Two Generations. HIVEqual. n.d. http://www.hivequal.org/homepage/larry-kramer-truvada-whores-and-the-angry-divide-between-two-generations
  3. Logo. Revisiting “Truvada Whore” Three Years Later. NewNowNext. 2016. http://www.newnownext.com/revisiting-truvada-whore-three-years-later/02/2016/
  4. Emory University Rollins School of Public Health. North Carolina. AIDSVu. n.d. https://aidsvu.org/state/north-carolina/
  5. Calabrese SK, Underhill K. How Stigma Surrounding the Use of HIV Preexposure Prophylaxis Undermines Prevention and Pleasure: A Call to Destigmatize “Truvada Whores”. American journal of public health. 2015;105(10):1960-1964.
  6. Calabrese SK, Earnshaw VA, Underhill K, Hansen NB, Dovidio JF. The Impact of Patient Race on Clinical Decisions Related to Prescribing HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP): Assumptions About Sexual Risk Compensation and Implications for Access. AIDS and behavior. 2014;18(2):226-240.
  7. Rosenberg ES, Grey JA, Sanchez TH, Sullivan PS. Rates of Prevalent HIV Infection, Prevalent Diagnoses, and New Diagnoses Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in US States, Metropolitan Statistical Areas, and Counties, 2012-2013. JMIR Public Health Surveill. 2016;2(1):e22.
  8. Britz JJ. To Know or not to Know: A Moral Reflection on Information Poverty. Journal of Information Science. 2004;30(3):192-204.

 

Medical Ethics & Patient-Provider Communication

There are four primary principles for ethical decision-making in health care; however, these four principles do not necessarily yield the most beneficial results for trans youth or bodies that exist in contradistinction to state controlled modes of life. In essence, these bodies are unruly (or unrule-able), but the state continues to control them within the biopolitical frame, where biopolitics refers to the state’s ability to control the way its subjects live. Susan Stryker expands on Foucauldian biopolitics, with a specific trans studies bent, to describe it as “the calculus of costs and benefits through which the biological capacities of a population are optimally managed for state or state-like ends.” The medical-industrial complex works within this frame to manage the modes of life for trans youth, relying on non-maleficence and a paternalistic notion of future expectations to continually withhold medical intervention. Through withholding medical intervention, the state continually retains the ability to name and define trans youth within the gender framework—which isn’t to mention the biopolitical control of scientific claims to a “biological sex” or the medical narratives required to achieve intervention even for adults.

The four primary principles of health care ethics, referenced previously, are (1) respect for autonomy, (2) justice, (3) beneficence, and (4) non-maleficence. The principle of respect for autonomy refers to an individual’s ability to make decisions about their own body without constraints and refers to the ability to act freely (Beauchamp, 2007). Within the biopolitical framework, there are clearly constraints placed on the individual by the state, limiting the various modes of life that should be available to the autonomous individual. Further, for any youth, autonomy is diminished because of parental control. Nonetheless, informed consent in the medical setting provides the illusion of autonomy, though informed consent also positions the question of adequate information. Within the doctor-patient power relation, doctors are able to establish what counts as truth and the state determines what counts as adequate information, allowing for continued constraints on various modes of living that are unruly. For example, misinformation provided before receiving an abortion.

Book Review: The Medical Library Association Guide to Data Management for Librarians

Federer, L. (Ed.). (2016). The Medical Library Association Guide to Data Management for Librarians. Rowman & Littlefield.

The Medical Library Association Guide to Data Management for Librarians (published by Rowman & Littlefield; September 2016; $65 paperback or $125 hardback) attempts to prepare librarians to meet the growing demands for data management assistance and instruction with chapters from librarians across the spectrum of libraries, including medical libraries, academic libraries, government libraries, and special libraries. The growing desire for data management services makes this edited volume particularly timely.

Lisa Federer, who edited the volume, is a well-known research data informationist at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Library, holding an MLIS from UCLA, an MA in English, and graduate certificates in data visualization and data science. The other contributors are similarly well-credentialed, representing individuals with PhDs or library science degrees, researchers from different areas, and data scientists and librarians.

The volume is separated into three parts: Data Management: Theory and Foundations; Data Management across the Research Data Life Cycle; and Data Management in Practice. The final product provides a useful and expansive discussion of data management, making this an important book for librarians who are just getting their feet wet in the field, which is likely the case for many librarians who don’t have experience in data management but who are being asked to provide these services. However, this broad brush also means that some depth is lost. The chapters are generally short with about ten or fewer pages of text, which provides a useful and brief introduction for librarians to start thinking about data services—further facilitated by the “pearls” providing at the end of each chapter, reflecting key points. They also generally provide recommended readings and the bibliographies are extensive sources for possible future reading.

Nonetheless, as seems to be the case in many edited volumes, the usefulness and rigor of chapters is fairly variable. Several chapters fall too far down the theory rabbit hole. The chapters are already fairly short, which becomes more of an issue when half of the chapter is taken up in regurgitating theory. For example, the chapter “Data 101” spends considerable ink discussing adult learning theory but then only provides short paragraphs on interesting topics such as data information literacy. The chapter “Library Infrastructures for Scholarship at Scale” buries itself in theory to make the simplistic claim that different disciplines have different data needs.

On the other hand, many of the chapters provide incredibly useful insights, such as the chapter on Data Information Literacy (DIL), which expands on the lacking definition in “Data 101” to develop the topic, and the chapter on data visualization which provides practical advice for providing data visualization services in the library. Further, the final section on Data Management in Practice, provides important context in the academic library, the undergraduate population, the medical center, the lab, and the hospital, providing useful examples of the variance in implementation throughout different communities and environments.

Exploring Dating Application Profile Fields Through Health Behavior Theories

Location-aware or geososocial mobile dating and sex-seeking applications are becoming more and more common for men who have sex with men (MSM). Of these apps, Grindr is likely the most popular with 3.5 million users opening the app each day (Kelly, 2018). This mobile app presents other users profile images in a 3-column grid, allowing a user to quickly scan through the profile images of other users to find potential partners. Goedel and Duncan (2015) suggest that MSM use multiple apps and spend considerable time on them, meaning that there are many different sites for interventions with MSM but also the sustained time on the apps might suggest that these would be fruitful locations.

Given the high use of these applications, I’m interested in the ways that public health researchers can work with(in) these applications or the ways that these applications can make themselves more socially responsible with respect to users’ sexual health. Using Grindr as a case study, we can look at the ways that the user profile works with the Health Belief Model (HBM) and Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) to possibly result in health behavior changes for HIV testing and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) usage (Glanz, Rimer, & Viswanath, 2008).

On Grindr, there are currently options for sharing information about HIV status and last tested date (see image below). Users can select from various restricted vocabulary options to show to their fellow users. In this sense, seeing that other people are taking PrEP or have gotten tested recently might work within the SCT concepts of collective efficacy and observational learning. MSM on these apps can see other MSM are getting tested and taking PrEP, and these aspects might impact individual self-efficacy and perceived benefits within the Health Belief Model while also serving as a cue to action for the behavior change. As such, combining these aspects of SCT and the HBM, these two simple factors on the dating profile might increase the likelihood of users on these apps engaging in HIV testing or PrEP usage.

However, it was recently revealed that Grindr was sharing this health information with other companies (Kelly, 2018). It will be interesting to see how users make choices about using these fields in the future if they feel distrust towards the application. This news came quickly after Grindr proposed offering reminders and information about HIV testing to users based on the last tested dates provided on their profiles (McNeil, 2018).

Other dating applications for MSM, and for other populations, could employ similar strategies in their user profile descriptive schemas. Future research could also look empirically at the impact of these aspects of the profile on health behavior change. It may also be possible to expand sexual health information sharing to include information about other STIs to encourage testing and prevention beyond HIV.

 

Bibliography

Glanz, K., Rimer, B. K., & Viswanath, K. (Eds.). (2008). Health behavior and health education: theory, research, and practice. John Wiley & Sons.

Goedel, W. C., & Duncan, D. T. (2015). Geosocial-Networking App Usage Patterns of Gay, Bisexual, and Other Men Who Have Sex With Men: Survey Among Users of Grindr, A Mobile Dating App. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 17(5), 1-1. doi:10.2196/publichealth.4353

Kelly, H (2 April 2018). Grindr to stop sharing HIV status of users with outside companies. CNN Money. Retrieved 4 April 2018.

McNeil, D. G., Jr (26 March 2018). Grindr App to Offer H.I.V. Test Reminders. NY Times. Retrieved 4 April 2018.

 

The Continuing HIV Disparity for Black Men

Despite only making up 2% of the U.S. population, men who have sex with men (MSM) account for 52% of the U.S. population of individuals living with HIV, and these rates don’t seem to be decreasing.[1] In 2013, MSM accounted for 65% of new HIV diagnoses.[2] Among MSM, black men are disproportionately at risk of contracting HIV, accounting for 30% of MSM living with HIV and almost 40% of new HIV diagnoses in 2012 though black people only constitute about 13% of the U.S. population.[3] Of these black MSM newly diagnosed, 38% were between the ages of 13 and 24 in 2015.[4] Of black gay and bisexual men living with HIV, only 54% received continuous HIV care.[5]

These statistics illustrate the stark disparity in HIV treatment and prevention for queer black men, especially younger queer black men. According to a 2018 CDC report, black men are not receiving PrEP prescriptions or being provided PrEP at the rate that they should be.[6] Some health professionals will likely attempt to target black MSM, claiming that they are less likely to be aware of PrEP, are more likely to have sex with other black men and are thus more likely to contract HIV because of the higher prevalence rate in black communities, are more likely to participate in riskier sexual behaviors, are less willing to take medications, etc. Many of the reasons for lower PrEP usage among black MSM will likely be attributed to decisions made by black MSM themselves.

However, in 2014, Calebrese et al found, in a nationally representative sample of medical students, that students were less likely to prescribe PrEP to a black man than a white man.[7] A pervasive logic surrounding PrEP, exacerbated by the stereotype of the Truvada Whore, is that people who take PrEP will participate in riskier sex.[8] However, PrEP should be the answer to protecting individuals who are participating in riskier behavior.[9] Ultimately, this logic is backwards and slut-shaming, and it puts black MSM at greater risk because it keeps them from being prescribed PrEP.

We should be looking to medical schools to better prepare their students to provide necessary care to LGBTQ+ people more broadly, but also from this example more specifically to black MSM. We should also be targeting current providers to combat issues of implicit bias, homophobia, and heterosexism that are preventing LGBTQ+ individuals, especially black MSM, from accessing the best possible care.

[1] “MSM Population Profile.” AIDSVu, 9 Mar. 2018, aidsvu.org/aidsvu-in-use/msm-population-profile/. AIDSVu is maintained by faculty and staff at Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health in partnership with Gilead Sciences, Inc. and the Center for AIDS Research at Emory University (CFAR) with assistance from members of other institutions. Some of the data and statistics presented on the AIDSVu website is provided from other medical and health surveillance institutions, such as the CDC.

[2] Ibid.

[3] Ibid.

[4] Ibid.

[5] “HIV among African American Gay and Bisexual Men.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 14 Feb. 2018, www.cdc.gov/hiv/group/msm/bmsm.html.

[6] “HIV prevention pill not reaching most Americans who could benefit – especially people of color.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 6 Mar. 2018, www.cdc.gov/nchhstp/newsroom/2018/croi-2018-PrEP-press-release.html.

[7] Calabrese, S. K., Earnshaw, V. A., Underhill, K., Hansen, N. B., & Dovidio, J. F. (2014). The Impact of Patient Race on Clinical Decisions Related to Prescribing HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP): Assumptions About Sexual Risk Compensation and Implications for Access. AIDS Behav, 18(2), 226-240. doi:10.1007/s10461-013-0675-x

[8] Calabrese, S. K., & Underhill, K. (2015). How Stigma Surrounding the Use of HIV Preexposure Prophylaxis Undermines Prevention and Pleasure: A Call to Destigmatize “Truvada Whores”. Am J Public Health, 105(10), 1960-1964. doi:10.2105/ajph.2015.302816

[9] Calabrese, S. K., Magnus, M., Mayer, K. H., Krakower, D. S., Eldahan, A. I., Hawkins, L. A. G., . . . Dovidio, J. F. (2017). “Support Your Client at the Space That They’re in”: HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Prescribers’ Perspectives on PrEP-Related Risk Compensation. AIDS Patient Care STDS, 31(4), 196-204. doi:10.1089/apc.2017.0002

Changes to HIV Criminalization Laws in NC

According to a report updated in August 2017, 34 states in the US had HIV criminalization laws still on the books, written at least twenty years ago at the height of the AIDS epidemic [1]. According to the Human Rights Campaign, 25 states in the US have “laws that criminalize behaviors that carry a low or negligible risk of HIV transmission” [2]. Most of these laws require disclosure of HIV status for those living with HIV, and in some states, failure to disclose or follow other laws could result in a felony.

There are various examples of these laws being put to work, including a man living with HIV being convicted of a felony and sentenced for 35 years for spitting on a police officer because his saliva was considered a deadly weapon though HIV transmission doesn’t occur through saliva [3].

In North Carolina, HIV criminalization laws are contained in the health code, and the North Carolina Commission for Public Health recently voted to update the laws in order to better reflect our current understanding of HIV and the current methods available for HIV treatment and prevention [4].

According to the previous law, any individual living with HIV was required to disclose their HIV status to any sexual partners and to use a condom during sex, and anyone living with HIV was unable to donate organs. With the changes to the law, an HIV positive individual who is virally suppressed for at least 6 months does not have to disclose their HIV status to sexual partners or use a condom during sex, and even if they aren’t virally suppressed, if their partner is taking PrEP, they don’t have to use a condom. Also, an individual living with HIV doesn’t have to use a condom when having sex with another individual living with HIV, and individuals living with HIV can donate organs to other individuals living with HIV [5]

This is an exciting step forward for North Carolina that will hopefully make changes for HIV stigma while also representing current options for HIV treatment and prevention. These changes also recognize that HIV is an ongoing issue, especially with high rates of new diagnoses of HIV in the South.

Nonetheless, some activists are still worried that this is only a step forward for those who are already at an advantage. Many individuals are still unable to access healthcare and the medical system for various reasons, limiting their access to PrEP for HIV treatment to attain viral suppression. Only 50% of individuals living with HIV stay in care. Further, Black and Latinx individuals still receive worse care and have less access to care. This results in a continued disparity. Though the changes to these laws are a step forward in creating evidence-based laws and hopefully decreasing stigma and unjust prosecution, there are still significant barriers for individuals seeking HIV treatment and prevention care [6].

“Chart: State-by-State Criminal Laws Used to Prosecute People with HIV, Center for HIV Law and Policy (2017).” The Center for HIV Law and Policy, 1 Aug. 2017, www.hivlawandpolicy.org/resources/chart-state-state-criminal-laws-used-prosecute-people-hiv-center-hiv-law-and-policy-2012

Jackson, Hope. “A Look At HIV Criminalization Bills Across The Country.” Human Rights Campaign, 26 Feb. 2018, www.hrc.org/blog/a-look-at-hiv-criminalization-bills-across-the-country.

Kovach, Gretel C. “Prison for Man With H.I.V. Who Spit on a Police Officer.” The New York Times, The New York Times, 16 May 2008, www.nytimes.com/2008/05/16/us/16spit.html.

Adeleke, Christina. “Choose Science over Fear.” QNotes, 24 Feb. 2018, goqnotes.com/58326/choose-science-over-fear/.

“HIV Criminalization Laws Change in North Carolina.” WNCAP, 20 Feb. 2018, wncap.org/2018/02/20/hiv-criminalization-laws-change-north-carolina/

Salzman, Sony. “Updated HIV Laws May Only Protect the Privileged.” Tonic, 20 Mar. 2018, tonic.vice.com/en_us/article/wj7e9z/updated-hiv-laws-may-only-protect-privileged.

A Queer Health Reading List

The following is a list of books and articles related to queer health that might be useful for some individuals interested in the topic. The list is by no means exhaustive.

HIV:

  1. Race, K. (2016). Reluctant Objects Sexual Pleasure as a Problem for HIV Biomedical Prevention. GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies22(1), 1-31.
  2. Gonzalez, O. R. (2010). Tracking the bugchaser: Giving the gift of HIV/AIDS. Cultural Critique75(1), 82-113.

Research & Infrastructures:

  1. Nguyen, V. K. (2009). Government-by-exception: Enrolment and experimentality in mass HIV treatment programmes in Africa. Social Theory & Health7(3), 196-217.
  2. Murphy, M. (2017). The economization of life. Duke University Press.

Regarding MSM:

  1. Boellstorff, T. (2011). But do not identify as gay: A proleptic genealogy of the MSM category. Cultural Anthropology26(2), 287-312.
  2. Young, R. M., & Meyer, I. H. (2005). The trouble with “MSM” and “WSW”: Erasure of the sexual-minority person in public health discourse. American journal of public health95(7), 1144-1149.

Medical interventions:

  1. Epstein, Steven. 2010. “The great undiscussable: Anal cancer, HPV, and gay men’s health.” In Three shots at prevention: The HPV vaccine and the politics of medicine’s simple solutions, edited by Keith Wailoo, Julie Livingston, Steven Epstein, and Robert Aronowitz. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, pp. 61 -90.
  2. Blackwell, Courtney, Jeremy Birnholtz, and Charles Abbott. 2014. Seeing and being seen: Co-situation and impression formation using Grindr, a location-aware gay dating app. New Media & Society: 1461444814521595.

Precarity:

  1. Butler, J. (2006). Precarious life: The powers of mourning and violence. Verso.

PrEP:

  1. Fiereck, K. J. (2015). Cultural Conundrums: The Ethics of Epidemiology and the Problems of Population in Implementing Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis. Developing World Bioethics15(1), 27–39. http://doi.org/10.1111/dewb.12034
  2. Singh, J. A., & Mills, E. J. (2005). The Abandoned Trials of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis for HIV: What Went Wrong? PLoS Medicine2(9), e234. http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.0020234
  3. Calabrese, S. K., Earnshaw, V. A., Underhill, K., Hansen, N. B., & Dovidio, J. F. (2014). The Impact of Patient Race on Clinical Decisions Related to Prescribing HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP): Assumptions About Sexual Risk Compensation and Implications for Access. AIDS Behav, 18(2), 226-240. doi:10.1007/s10461-013-0675-x
  4. Calabrese, S. K., Magnus, M., Mayer, K. H., Krakower, D. S., Eldahan, A. I., Hawkins, L. A. G., . . . Dovidio, J. F. (2017). “Support Your Client at the Space That They’re in”: HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Prescribers’ Perspectives on PrEP-Related Risk Compensation. AIDS Patient Care STDS, 31(4), 196-204. doi:10.1089/apc.2017.0002
  5. Calabrese, S. K., & Underhill, K. (2015). How Stigma Surrounding the Use of HIV Preexposure Prophylaxis Undermines Prevention and Pleasure: A Call to Destigmatize “Truvada Whores”. Am J Public Health, 105(10), 1960-1964. doi:10.2105/ajph.2015.302816
  6. Dumit, J. (2012). Drugs for life: how pharmaceutical companies define our health. Duke University Press.

Trans health:

  1. Plemons, E. D. (2014). It is as it does: Genital form and function in sex reassignment surgery. Journal of Medical Humanities35(1), 37-55.
  2. Preciado, Paul Beatriz. 2013. Testo junkie: Sex, drugs, and biopolitics in the pharmacopornographic era. New York: The Feminist Press at CUNY. (End of “The Micropolitics of Gender,” pp. 365 – 398).
  3. Spade, Dean. 2006. “Mutilating Gender.” In The Transgender Studies Reader, edited by Susan Stryker and Stephen Wittle. New York: Routledge, 315-32.
  4. Currah, Paisley. 2008. Expecting bodies: the pregnant man and transgender exclusion from the Employment Non-Discrimination Act. Women’s Studies Quarterly, 36(3&4).
  5. Crawford, Lucas Cassidy. 2008. Transgender without organs? Mobilizing a geo-affective theory of gender modification. WSQ: Women’s Studies Quarterly, 36(3&4): 127-43.
  6. Butler, J. (2001). Doing justice to someone: Sex reassignment and allegories of transsexuality. GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies7(4), 621-636.
  7. Karaian, Lara. 2013. Pregnant men: Repronormativity, critical trans theory and the re (conceive)ing of sex and pregnancy in law. Social & Legal Studies: 0964663912474862.

Critical Disability Studies:

  1. McRuer, R., & Wilkerson, A. L. (Eds.). (2003). Desiring disability: Queer theory meets disability studies. Duke University Press.
  2. Cheslack-Postava, Keely, and Rebecca M. Jordan-Young. 2012. Autism spectrum disorders: toward a gendered embodiment model. Social science & medicine 74(11): 1667-1674.
  3. Jack, Jordynn. 2011. The Extreme Male Brain? Incrementum and the Rhetorical Gendering of Autism. Disability Studies Quarterly 31(3). http://dsq-sds.org/article/view/1672/1599
  4. Garland-Thomson, R. (2005). Feminist disability studies. Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society30(2), 1557-1587.
  5. Shakespeare, T. (2006). The social model of disability. The disability studies reader2, 197-204.
  6. Breckenridge, C. A., & Vogler, C. A. (2001). The critical limits of embodiment: Disability’s criticism. Public Culture13(3), 349-357.

Masculinity & health:

  1. MacLeish, Kenneth T. 2012. Armor and anesthesia: exposure, feeling, and the soldier’s body. Medical anthropology quarterly 26(1): 49-68.
  2. Oudshoorn, Nelly. 2000. “Imagined men: Representations of masculinities in discourses on male contraceptive technology.” In Bodies of technology: Women’s involvement with reproductive medicine, edited by Ann Rudinow Saetnan, Nelly Oudshoorn, and Marta Kirejczyk. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 123-45.
  3. Serlin, David. 2006. “Disability, masculinity, and the prosthetics of war, 1945 to 2005.” In The prosthetic impulse: From a posthuman present to a biocultural future, edited by Marquard Smith and Joanne Mora. Cambridge: The MIT Press, 155-86.
  4. Shakespeare, T. (1999). The sexual politics of disabled masculinity. Sexuality and disability17(1), 53-64.

Gender theory, race, and reproductive health:

  1. Waggoner, Miranda R. 2015. Cultivating the maternal future: Public health and the prepregnant self.” Signs 40(4): 939-962.
  2. Franklin, Sarah. 2013. Biological Relatives: IVF, Stem Cells, and the Future of Kinship. Durham: Duke University Press. (“Miracle Babies” and “Reproductive Technologies,” pp. 31 – 67 and 150 – 84).
  3. Murphy, M. (2012). Seizing the means of reproduction: Entanglements of feminism, health, and technoscience. Duke University Press.
  4. Roberts, Dorothy E. Killing the black body: Race, reproduction, and the meaning of liberty. Vintage Books, 1999.
  5. Bridges, Khiara. 2011. Reproducing race: An ethnography of pregnancy as a site of racialization. Berkeley: The University of California Press. (“The Production of Unruly Bodies” and “The ‘primitive pelvis,’ racial folklore, and atavism in contemporary forms of medical disenfranchisement,” pp. 74 – 100 and 103-43).

39th Minority Health Conference – 23 Feb

The 39th Minority Health Conference will be held at the Friday Center in Chapel Hill next week (Friday, February 23, 2018). According to the conference website, “This year’s theme, Reclaiming the Narrative, is based in the recognition that the world is organized by the stories we tell. Stories have the power to influence the way we view ourselves and others and have the power to shape our actions. Given this sometimes unacknowledged influence, we must ask who are the storytellers, and who benefits from these narratives. The answers to these questions can offer an understanding of how we as public health professionals can progress and push public health agendas forward in a meaningful way. This year’s theme challenges us to end perpetuation of damaging rhetoric against marginalized communities. It highlights how resilient communities have fought to speak truth to power and refused to have their voices silenced and how public health practitioners can join such efforts. By reclaiming the narrative, communities and public health practitioners can reconcile the past and present and take agency in the future to promote health for all people.”

The event will feature keynote lectures from Monica Raye Simpson, Executive Director of SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective, and Vann R. Newkirk II, MSPH, a staff writer at The Atlantic.

Information about registering for the event in person is available here, but there is also an option to watch a live webcast of the event.

Fore more information about the event, visit their website.

Warming Up Before Your Workout With the RAMP Method

Many people, perhaps especially men, go into the gym for a heavy workout and head straight to the weights. At best, they might take a few minutes on a treadmill before getting into their workout. However, research shows that this isn’t the best way to exercise. A proper warm up can improve the strength and power of your muscles among other benefits (Jeffreys, 2006).

The RAMP method is a three stage (though four letters) method for optimizing your warm up: (1) Raise your heart rate, blood flow, body temperature, etc. (2) Activate the muscles groups you’ll be exercising or that you want to focus on and Mobilize the joints and ranges of motion that will be employed for your workout, (3) Potentiate, referring to using activities more directly related to the sport or workout you’ll be doing (e.g. if I’m doing back squats, here I could start doing air squats or back squat with the bar and slowly add weight up to my working set.)

Using the RAMP method to warm up for leg day, we could start with 5-10 minutes on a treadmill, stairclimber, or using other cardio. Next, we can either mobilize or activate first. In this case, we might use a foam roller or dynamic stretches to mobilize the hip and knee joints. To mobilize the hips, you might try forward and side leg swings, half pigeon pose, or frog pose. Look for dynamic stretches that keep you actively moving through the range of motion rather than static stretches. To activate the leg muscles, especially the glutes, try clams, lateral walks or air squats all using a resistance band. If you have trouble feeling your calves, try one-legged calf raises using your bodyweight or light weights to activate the calf muscles before your workout. For the potentiate phase, move towards the specific exercises for your workout. Perform lunges or squats with just your bodyweight and slowly add weight to your working sets.

 

Jeffreys, I. (2006). Warm up revisited–the ‘ramp’method of optimising performance preparation. Uksca J6, 15-19.

Image: Sutherland, Ben. “Warm up.” 10 Oct 2009. Online image licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC-BY2.0). Accessed 30 Jan 2018. https://www.flickr.com/photos/bensutherland/4004584424