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Early Dietary Interventions May Reduce Allergy Development

With increasing rates of allergies in kids, it’s not surprising that parents are looking for more information on how to reduce their child’s risk. The determinants of a child’s potential allergic development are still unclear. However, a youth’s surrounding environment, pharmaceutical intake and lifestyle are suspected to play major roles in this narrative. Specifically, food allergies are on the rise, and affect 5.6 million children in the United States alone. Many of these allergies are to common foods – like dairy, fish, and peanuts – and can be life threatening.

Early diet is suspected to play a role in allergy development, and new parents are desperate to know how introducing foods at specific times may or may not prevent food allergies. This dynamic can be difficult to navigate, but fortunately there is an abundance of research and literature on this topic. Just recently, the American Academy of Pediatrics has published a report which can serve as a guide for nutritional interventions in the context of allergy prevention. The report shows that there is no evidence to support that waiting to introduce allergenic foods beyond 4-6 months might prevent allergy development. Rather, on the contrary, an earlier introduction of such food to high-risk children (with a family history of allergies) may in fact be protective to allergy development. Overall, the study promotes that habitual eating habits and diversity in food choice are the best way to promote an infant’s healthy diet and reduce risk of allergies.

 

https://www.aaaai.org/conditions-and-treatments/library/allergy-library/prevalence-of-allergies-and-asthma

 

https://www.foodallergy.org/life-with-food-allergies/food-allergy-101/facts-and-statistics

 

https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2019/03/15/peds.2019-0281

 

https://www.cnn.com/2019/03/18/health/food-introduction-allergies-report/index.html

 

 

 

 

  • Kaeleigh Damico

    This makes sense to me based on what we know about how the rest of a child’s immune system develops. I’m curious on what impact parental diet might have on children’s allergies – particularly infants that are breastfeeding. If a child’s mom eats large amounts of nut products while breastfeeding, for example, will the child be more or less likely to develop nut allergies later in life?