Men's Health, Reproductive Health, Sexual Health , , , ,

A Queer Health Reading List

The following is a list of books and articles related to queer health that might be useful for some individuals interested in the topic. The list is by no means exhaustive.

HIV:

  1. Race, K. (2016). Reluctant Objects Sexual Pleasure as a Problem for HIV Biomedical Prevention. GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies22(1), 1-31.
  2. Gonzalez, O. R. (2010). Tracking the bugchaser: Giving the gift of HIV/AIDS. Cultural Critique75(1), 82-113.

Research & Infrastructures:

  1. Nguyen, V. K. (2009). Government-by-exception: Enrolment and experimentality in mass HIV treatment programmes in Africa. Social Theory & Health7(3), 196-217.
  2. Murphy, M. (2017). The economization of life. Duke University Press.

Regarding MSM:

  1. Boellstorff, T. (2011). But do not identify as gay: A proleptic genealogy of the MSM category. Cultural Anthropology26(2), 287-312.
  2. Young, R. M., & Meyer, I. H. (2005). The trouble with “MSM” and “WSW”: Erasure of the sexual-minority person in public health discourse. American journal of public health95(7), 1144-1149.

Medical interventions:

  1. Epstein, Steven. 2010. “The great undiscussable: Anal cancer, HPV, and gay men’s health.” In Three shots at prevention: The HPV vaccine and the politics of medicine’s simple solutions, edited by Keith Wailoo, Julie Livingston, Steven Epstein, and Robert Aronowitz. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, pp. 61 -90.
  2. Blackwell, Courtney, Jeremy Birnholtz, and Charles Abbott. 2014. Seeing and being seen: Co-situation and impression formation using Grindr, a location-aware gay dating app. New Media & Society: 1461444814521595.

Precarity:

  1. Butler, J. (2006). Precarious life: The powers of mourning and violence. Verso.

PrEP:

  1. Fiereck, K. J. (2015). Cultural Conundrums: The Ethics of Epidemiology and the Problems of Population in Implementing Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis. Developing World Bioethics15(1), 27–39. http://doi.org/10.1111/dewb.12034
  2. Singh, J. A., & Mills, E. J. (2005). The Abandoned Trials of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis for HIV: What Went Wrong? PLoS Medicine2(9), e234. http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.0020234
  3. Calabrese, S. K., Earnshaw, V. A., Underhill, K., Hansen, N. B., & Dovidio, J. F. (2014). The Impact of Patient Race on Clinical Decisions Related to Prescribing HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP): Assumptions About Sexual Risk Compensation and Implications for Access. AIDS Behav, 18(2), 226-240. doi:10.1007/s10461-013-0675-x
  4. Calabrese, S. K., Magnus, M., Mayer, K. H., Krakower, D. S., Eldahan, A. I., Hawkins, L. A. G., . . . Dovidio, J. F. (2017). “Support Your Client at the Space That They’re in”: HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Prescribers’ Perspectives on PrEP-Related Risk Compensation. AIDS Patient Care STDS, 31(4), 196-204. doi:10.1089/apc.2017.0002
  5. Calabrese, S. K., & Underhill, K. (2015). How Stigma Surrounding the Use of HIV Preexposure Prophylaxis Undermines Prevention and Pleasure: A Call to Destigmatize “Truvada Whores”. Am J Public Health, 105(10), 1960-1964. doi:10.2105/ajph.2015.302816
  6. Dumit, J. (2012). Drugs for life: how pharmaceutical companies define our health. Duke University Press.

Trans health:

  1. Plemons, E. D. (2014). It is as it does: Genital form and function in sex reassignment surgery. Journal of Medical Humanities35(1), 37-55.
  2. Preciado, Paul Beatriz. 2013. Testo junkie: Sex, drugs, and biopolitics in the pharmacopornographic era. New York: The Feminist Press at CUNY. (End of “The Micropolitics of Gender,” pp. 365 – 398).
  3. Spade, Dean. 2006. “Mutilating Gender.” In The Transgender Studies Reader, edited by Susan Stryker and Stephen Wittle. New York: Routledge, 315-32.
  4. Currah, Paisley. 2008. Expecting bodies: the pregnant man and transgender exclusion from the Employment Non-Discrimination Act. Women’s Studies Quarterly, 36(3&4).
  5. Crawford, Lucas Cassidy. 2008. Transgender without organs? Mobilizing a geo-affective theory of gender modification. WSQ: Women’s Studies Quarterly, 36(3&4): 127-43.
  6. Butler, J. (2001). Doing justice to someone: Sex reassignment and allegories of transsexuality. GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies7(4), 621-636.
  7. Karaian, Lara. 2013. Pregnant men: Repronormativity, critical trans theory and the re (conceive)ing of sex and pregnancy in law. Social & Legal Studies: 0964663912474862.

Critical Disability Studies:

  1. McRuer, R., & Wilkerson, A. L. (Eds.). (2003). Desiring disability: Queer theory meets disability studies. Duke University Press.
  2. Cheslack-Postava, Keely, and Rebecca M. Jordan-Young. 2012. Autism spectrum disorders: toward a gendered embodiment model. Social science & medicine 74(11): 1667-1674.
  3. Jack, Jordynn. 2011. The Extreme Male Brain? Incrementum and the Rhetorical Gendering of Autism. Disability Studies Quarterly 31(3). http://dsq-sds.org/article/view/1672/1599
  4. Garland-Thomson, R. (2005). Feminist disability studies. Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society30(2), 1557-1587.
  5. Shakespeare, T. (2006). The social model of disability. The disability studies reader2, 197-204.
  6. Breckenridge, C. A., & Vogler, C. A. (2001). The critical limits of embodiment: Disability’s criticism. Public Culture13(3), 349-357.

Masculinity & health:

  1. MacLeish, Kenneth T. 2012. Armor and anesthesia: exposure, feeling, and the soldier’s body. Medical anthropology quarterly 26(1): 49-68.
  2. Oudshoorn, Nelly. 2000. “Imagined men: Representations of masculinities in discourses on male contraceptive technology.” In Bodies of technology: Women’s involvement with reproductive medicine, edited by Ann Rudinow Saetnan, Nelly Oudshoorn, and Marta Kirejczyk. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 123-45.
  3. Serlin, David. 2006. “Disability, masculinity, and the prosthetics of war, 1945 to 2005.” In The prosthetic impulse: From a posthuman present to a biocultural future, edited by Marquard Smith and Joanne Mora. Cambridge: The MIT Press, 155-86.
  4. Shakespeare, T. (1999). The sexual politics of disabled masculinity. Sexuality and disability17(1), 53-64.

Gender theory, race, and reproductive health:

  1. Waggoner, Miranda R. 2015. Cultivating the maternal future: Public health and the prepregnant self.” Signs 40(4): 939-962.
  2. Franklin, Sarah. 2013. Biological Relatives: IVF, Stem Cells, and the Future of Kinship. Durham: Duke University Press. (“Miracle Babies” and “Reproductive Technologies,” pp. 31 – 67 and 150 – 84).
  3. Murphy, M. (2012). Seizing the means of reproduction: Entanglements of feminism, health, and technoscience. Duke University Press.
  4. Roberts, Dorothy E. Killing the black body: Race, reproduction, and the meaning of liberty. Vintage Books, 1999.
  5. Bridges, Khiara. 2011. Reproducing race: An ethnography of pregnancy as a site of racialization. Berkeley: The University of California Press. (“The Production of Unruly Bodies” and “The ‘primitive pelvis,’ racial folklore, and atavism in contemporary forms of medical disenfranchisement,” pp. 74 – 100 and 103-43).