Nutrition, Uncategorized

Turmeric’s Health Benefits

To this day, if I’m feeling a little under the weather, my parents will prescribe a healthy dose of turmeric. Sore throat? Teaspoon of turmeric in warm milk. Acne acting up? Make a turmeric paste. Feeling weary? Add some more turmeric in your veggies when you cook.

Turmeric is a naturally bitter spice, but my ma and pa are right–it’s somewhat of a super food! It’s an anti-oxidant as well as an anti-inflammatory agent. It’s also been known to have anti-fungal and anti-cancer properties.

Curcumin, the phytochemical that gives turmeric it’s trademark yellow color, makes up about 2-5% of turmeric, but is responsible for most of its recognized therapeutic effects. It was first extracted from turmeric in the early 1800s and since then has been used extensively in Asian cooking, religious ceremonies, and for medicinal purposes. It works by regulating transcription factors (proteins that are important in converting DNA to RNA, which then codes for genes). It is also thought to bind to cellular proteins, and to be able to help stop the growth of tumor cells.

But wait, there’s more! With that strong yellow color, it makes a very effective natural food coloring, and can function as a preservative of sorts. All in all, not a bad spice to throw in the mix every now and again.

I think I may just roll my eyes a little less the next time my mom tells me drink a warm cup of haldi (Hindi for turmeric) milk before bed.