Disease, Research Findings

Ebola vaccine-preliminary trials

Ebola is a severe virus disease that spreads to humans from wild animals (often those found in rain forests), and can then be transmitted from human to human. The virus will onset between 2 to 21 days of exposure, and can cause fever, muscle pain, headaches and sore throats, followed by vomiting, diarrhea, impaired kidney/liver function, and bleeding. Though there are treatments, and re-hydration helps, there is as of yet no cure or licensed treatment to neutralize the virus.

In March of 2014, the World Health Organization recognized an outbreak of Ebola in West Africa–the largest one to date, and fatal in an estimated 40% of cases. It spread quickly in both rural and urban communities. The CDC reported, as of April 2016, 11,325 deaths.

An article published in The Lancet-an infectious disease academic journal- this month says that this outbreak “highlighted the need for a safe, effective vaccine with a rapid onset of protection”. A phase 1 study (the stage of vaccine development in which a vaccine is administered to what is considered a small group of adults) was completed in June of 2015 and demonstrated some success. Nearly 500 participants finished the study, which lasted 360 days, and most of them showed promising amounts of lasting immunity starting about two weeks into the study. The study was led by scientists at the World Health Organization.

Of course, the study was just short of a year, and in a relatively small sample size, so there is future research to be done. Still, the potential protection offered by a successful vaccine is an exciting thought.

Sources-

World Health Organization: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs103/en/

Lancet article: http://www.thelancet.com/journals/laninf/article/PIIS1473-3099(17)30313-4/fulltext

CDC, Infectious Disease Adviser